Data and goals 1

Products and solutions

Graph Goals 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Life cycle assessment goals

  Goals          
Goals
2012 Calculate and disclose Product Carbon Footprint (PCF) values using the Product Attribute to Impact Algorithm (PAIA) tool for new HP notebook, desktop, and monitor products.

Progress: We used the PAIA tool to calculate PCF values in response to bids and tenders, as well as customer inquiries. We have not yet disclosed these calculations due to lack of product category standards for PC products. Product category standards establish comparable methodologies for credible and transparent disclosure. HP is leading an effort to develop a consistent methodology for computers that will support credible and transparent disclosure in the future.
  Complete life cycle assessments on 20 additional HP LaserJet printers, one HP scanner, and one book vs. e-reader.

Progress: We exceeded our goal, completing life cycle assessments on 53 HP LaserJet printers, one HP scanner, and one book vs. e-reader. We also completed an LCA on one HP InkJet printer.
  Work with industry to establish product category rules (PCRs) for imaging products.

Progress: Collaborated with Underwriters Laboratories (UL) Environment to complete PCRs for printers and imaging products.
2014 Promote and support the development of an IEC Technical Report to establish harmonized product category PCF standards for PCs and displays.

Materials goals

           
Goals
2012 Complete the phase-out of bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), and butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) in newly introduced personal computing products by the end of 2012.

Progress: Complete: All personal computing products to be newly introduced in 2013 meet the HP GSE requirement for phasing out the phthalates DEHP, DBP, and BBP.

Paper goals

  Goals          
Goals
2015 50% or more of HP-branded paper will be FSC-certified or have at least 30% post-consumer waste content by the end of 2015.

Progress: We are currently at over 40% and on track to meet this target.

GHG emissions from product transport (estimated)2 [tonnes CO2e]

  1,800,000 1,700,000 1,900,000 1,900,000 1,700,000
Data

In 2012, GHG emissions from transporting HP products totaled an estimated 1.7 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e). This is about 10% less than GHG emissions from our own operations.

Total 1,800,000 1,700,000 1,900,000 1,900,000 1,700,000

2These figures for transport GHG emissions are based on data reported by logistics service providers that HP contracts to deliver our products. They differ from the larger product life cycle assessment-based estimate presented in the Energy and climate section of this report, which includes additional upstream and downstream transport related to our products, as well as retail and storage. These data do not include data from all recent HP acquisitions.

Transport goals

  Goals          
Goals
2012 Implement network enhancements, mode changes, and route optimiza-tion that decrease greenhouse gas emissions from product transport by 180,000 tonnes of CO2e, since the end of 2008.

Progress: We exceeded our goal by achieving a CO2e reduction of 190,000 tonnes through air-to-ocean and truck-to-rail conversions, direct ship programs, warehouse consolidations, and other network enhancement programs.
2016 Implement network enhancements, mode changes, and route optimization that decrease greenhouse gas emissions from product transport by 200,000 tonnes of CO2e since the end of 2012.

Product return and recycling3

Graph Goals 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Total cumulative recycling-computer hardware and supplies combined [tonnes]

    651,000 763,000 884,500 1,018,400 1,152,000

Total cumulative recycling-computer hardware and supplies combined [million pounds]

  1,435 1,682 1,949 2,245 2,540
Data

In 2012, HP recycled 295 million pounds of electronic products and supplies, bringing the total since 1987 to 2.54 billion pounds.

Total 1,435 1,682 1,949 2,245 2,540

Total reuse and recycling combined [tonnes, approximate]

  153,000 142,000 151,000 160,600 159,550
Data

In 2012, we recovered 159,550 tonnes of hardware and supplies. This included approximately 3.9 million hardware units weighing 26,000 tonnes for reuse and remarketing (nearly 60% returned by business customers) and approximately 133,550 tonnes for recycling (more than 80% of which was returned by consumers).

Reuse of equipment4 34,000 30,000 30,000 26,700 26,000
Recycling-hardware and supplies 119,000 112,000 121,000 133,900 133,550
Total 153,000 142,000 151,000 160,600 159,550

4The decrease in tonnage from 2008 – 2012 is due to a reduction in the average weight of returned units, rather than a decline in the total number of returned units. Returned units during that period were: 2008: 3.46 million units; 2009: 3.58 million units; 2010: 3.81 million units; 2011: 3.44 million units; 2012: 3.9 million units.

Reuse of equipment4

    34,000 30,000 30,000 26,700 26,000

Recycling-hardware and supplies

    119,000 112,000 121,000 133,900 133,550

Number of countries and territories with HP return and recycling programs

  53 56 58 60 69
Data

HP offers hardware recycling programs in 69 countries and territories, and free recycling for HP cartridges in 56 countries and territories.

Total 53 56 58 60 69

Total recycling, by region [tonnes]

  119,000 112,000 121,000 133,900 133,550
Data

In 2012, HP recovered approximately 133,550 tonnes (295 million pounds) of hardware and supplies for recycling, 45% from the Americas, 51% from Europe, Middle East, and Africa, and 4% from Asia Pacific and Japan.

Americas 36,000 37,500 38,600 49,600 60,165
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 76,700 69,300 76,300 77,100 67,700
Asia Pacific and Japan 6,700 5,600 5,900 7,200 5,685
Total 119,000 112,000 121,000 133,900 133,550

Americas

    36,000 37,500 38,600 49,600 60,165

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

    76,700 69,300 76,300 77,100 67,700

Asia Pacific and Japan

    6,700 5,600 5,900 7,200 5,685

Total recycling, by type [tonnes]

  119,000 112,000 121,000 133,900 133,550
Data

In 2012, HP recovered approximately 133,550 tonnes (295 million pounds) of hardware and supplies for recycling, 86% hardware, 13% HP LaserJet toner cartridges, and 1% HP ink cartridges.

Hardware 98,600 90,500 99,100 113,650 114,455
HP LaserJet toner cartridges5 19,000 20,100 19,600 18,550 17,350
HP ink cartridges5 1,850 1,800 2,200 1,700 1,745
Total 119,000 112,000 121,000 133,900 133,550

5Includes cartridges returned by customers and cartridges from HP internally through 2010. The 2011 and 2012 figures are cartridges returned by customers only.

Hardware

    98,600 90,500 99,100 113,650 114,455

HP LaserJet toner cartridges5

    19,000 20,100 19,600 18,550 17,350

HP ink cartridges5

    1,850 1,800 2,200 1,700 1,745

HP LaserJet toner cartridge recycling

             

Percentage of HP LaserJet market covered by program

    90% 90% 92% 94% 94%

Composition

             

Percentage of materials recycled into new products

    76% 80% 85% 82.1% 80.1%

Percentage of materials used for energy recovery

    24% 20% 15% 13.9% 15.9%

Percentage reuse of components6

          4.0% 4.0%

Percentage material in storage-pending processing6

          0.0% 0.0%

Percentage incineration6

          0.0% 0.0%

Percentage landfill6

          0.0% 0.0%

HP ink cartridge recycling

             

Percentage of ink market covered by program

    88% 88% 87% 88% 88%

Composition

             

Percentage of materials recovered for recycling

    59% 64% 73% 74.2% 69.1%

Percentage of materials used for energy recovery

    38% 31% 23% 21.6% 29.3%

Percentage reuse of components6

          0.0% 0.0%

Percentage material in storage-pending processing6

          0.2% 0.0%

Percentage incineration6

          4.0% 1.5%

Percentage landfill6

          0.0% 0.0%

Product return and recycling goals

           
Goals
2015 Recycle 3.5 billion pounds (1.6 million tonnes) of electronic products and supplies by the end of 2015 (since 1987).

Progress: In 2012, HP recycled 295 million pounds of electronic products and supplies, bringing the total since 1987 to 2.54 billion pounds.
  Reuse 40 million electronic products and accessory units by the end of 2015 (since 2003).

Progress: In 2012, HP reused 3.9 million electronic products and accessory units, bringing the total since 2003 to 30.95 million.

HP operations (also see GHG emissions below)

Graph Goals 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Energy use [million kWh]

      4,334 4,239 4,109
Data

HP operations consumed 4,109 million kilowatt hours (kWh) of energy in 2012, slightly less than 4,239 million kWh in 2011 and a 5% drop from 4,334 million kWh in 2010. The decrease from our 2010 baseline is the result of a 25% reduction in natural gas use combined with a 3% decrease in electricity consumption during that period. Our energy intensity relative to net revenue was 34.1 kWh per $ million USD of net revenue, a 2% increase on 2011 and a 1% drop from our 2010 baseline.

Natural gas 476 428 355  
Electricity (purchased) 3,822 3,789 3,729  
Total 4,334 4,239 4,109  
Energy intensity [thousand kWh/$ million USD of net revenue] 34.4 33.3 34.1  

Energy intensity [thousand kWh/$ million USD of net revenue]7

        34.4 33.3 34.1

Direct energy use in operations (corresponds to Scope 1 emissions)

        512 450 379

Electricity (generated on site) [million kWh]

        36 22 24

Natural gas [million kWh]

      476 428 355
Data
Americas 283 249 202
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 185 171 145
Asia Pacific and Japan 8 8 9
Total 476 428 355

Americas

        283 249 202

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        185 171 145

Asia Pacific and Japan

        8 8 9

Renewable (generated on site) [million kWh]

        2 2 3

Diesel/gas/oil8

        34 19 21

Indirect energy use (corresponds to Scope 2 emissions)

        3,822 3,789 3,729

Electricity (purchased) [million kWh]

      3,822 3,789 3,729
Data
Americas 2,224 2,187 2,111
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 1,006 952 944
Asia Pacific and Japan 592 650 674
Total 3,822 3,789 3,729

Americas

        2,224 2,187 2,111

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        1,006 952 944

Asia Pacific and Japan

        592 650 674

Voluntary purchases of renewable energy9 [million kWh]

    309 467 496
Data

We purchased approximately 496 million kWh of renewable energy worldwide in 2012, in addition to 3 million kWh generated on site, equivalent to 13% of our total electricity consumption and a 60% increase since 2010. As a result, we achieved our target to double renewable energy purchases to 8% of our electricity use by 2012 (we actually reached this goal in 2011, one year ahead of schedule). This figure includes a small amount of energy generated on-site, but more than 99% is through energy contracts in Ireland, the UK, and other European countries, plus renewable energy credits (RECs) in the United States. Our reporting excludes renewable energy provided by default in the power grid.

Total 309 467 496

9Renewable energy and renewable energy credits, in addition to the renewable energy available by default in the power grid.

Goals
2012 Double voluntary purchases of renewable energy to 8% of electricity use (in addition to the renewable energy available by default in the power grid).

Progress: We purchased 496 million kWh of renewable energy worldwide in 2012, in addition to 3 million kWh generated on-site, equivalent to 13% of our total electricity consumption. This performance continues to exceed our goal, first reached in 2011, and represents a 60% increase since 2010. We expect to maintain this level of commitment moving forward; purchasing renewable energy will be an important strategy toward meeting our new long-term GHG emissions reduction goal.

Nonhazardous waste [tonnes]

      92,500 82,900 117,400
Data

HP generated approximately 117,400 tonnes of nonhazardous waste in 2012, a 42% increase on 2011. This considerable rise is the result of two major building demolition projects in the Americas region which will not be repeated. We expect waste volumes to substantially reduce again next year.

Americas 55,800 51,300 88,900
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 19,400 15,900 13,500
Asia Pacific and Japan 17,300 15,800 15,100
Total 92,500 82,900 117,400

Americas

        55,800 51,300 88,900

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        19,400 15,900 13,500

Asia Pacific and Japan

        17,300 15,800 15,100

Nonhazardous waste landfill diversion rate [percentage of total produced]

           
Data

In 2012, we reused, recycled, or incinerated for energy around 103,500 tonnes of nonhazardous waste, achieving a landfill-diversion rate of 88.1%. This is an increase from 82.0% in 2011.

Global 84.8% 82.0% 88.1%
Americas 81.8% 80.4% 88.9%
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 89.3% 87.4% 89.1%
Asia Pacific and Japan 89.6% 81.8% 82.5%

Global

        84.8% 82.0% 88.1%

Americas

        81.8% 80.4% 88.9%

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        89.3% 87.4% 89.1%

Asia Pacific and Japan

        89.6% 81.8% 82.5%

Hazardous waste [tonnes]

      8,430 7,400 8,060
Data

HP generated approximately 8,060 tonnes of hazardous waste in 2012, a 9% increase compared with 2011.

Americas 3,600 3,030 2,760
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 2,570 2,560 3,040
Asia Pacific and Japan 2,260 1,810 2,270
Total 8,430 7,400 8,060

Americas

        3,600 3,030 2,760

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        2,570 2,560 3,040

Asia Pacific and Japan

        2,260 1,810 2,270

Water consumption [cubic meters]

    8,535,000 8,309,000 8,493,000
Data

In 2012, HP’s total water use was just under 8.5 million cubic meters worldwide, predominantly for domestic use in buildings, cooling, and landscape irrigation. This represents a 2% increase from 2011.

Americas 4,977,000 4,609,000 4,602,000
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 1,205,000 1,245,000 1,287,000
Asia Pacific and Japan 2,353,000 2,455,000 2,603,000
Total 8,535,000 8,309,000 8,493,000
Goals
2015 Reduce freshwater use at sites identified as water-stressed by 3%, compared to 2011 consumption at those locations.

Progress: Consumption at these locations increased by 3.1% in 2012, primarily due to higher production levels at one site in the Asia Pacific region. We are determining additional water-saving measures to meet our 2015 goal.

Americas

        4,977,000 4,609,000 4,602,000

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        1,205,000 1,245,000 1,287,000

Asia Pacific and Japan

        2,353,000 2,455,000 2,603,000

Wastewater generation [cubic meters]

      1,225,000 1,296,000 1,335,000
Data

Wastewater is not a significant environmental impact for HP. In 2012, our six imaging and printing product-manufacturing facilities generated 1,335,000 cubic meters of wastewater. These effluents are discharged under permits and treated at local treatment plants. We have procedures in place to prevent unauthorized discharges of chemicals to wastewater systems and ensure we do not discharge wastewater directly from HP operations to surface water or groundwater. Globally, our total wastewater generation increased by 3% over 2011.

Americas 562,000 587,000 533,000
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 264,000 259,000 290,000
Asia Pacific and Japan 399,000 450,000 512,000
Total 1,225,000 1,296,000 1,335,000

Americas

        562,000 587,000 533,000

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        264,000 259,000 290,000

Asia Pacific and Japan

        399,000 450,000 512,000

Ozone depletion potential of estimated emissions10 [kg of CFC-11 equivalent]

      9,619 6,782 535
Data

In 2012, we began to calculate ODS emissions by tracking those sites that have reported replacing refrigerants due to leakage. We apply an intensity factor based on those actual quantities for nonreporting sites. Previously, we estimated the level of leakage across the entire real estate portfolio based on the inventory of refrigerants in equipment and in storage. Between this change and the ongoing replacement of CFCs we saw a significant reduction in estimated ODS emissions in 2012.

Americas 6,307 5,963 354
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 70 96 54
Asia Pacific and Japan 3,242 723 127
Total 9,619 6,782 535

10In 2012, we began to calculate ODS emissions by tracking those sites that have reported replacing refrigerants due to leakage. We apply an intensity factor based on those actual quantities for non-reporting sites. Previously, we estimated the level of leakage across the entire real estate portfolio based on the inventory of refrigerants in equipment and in storage. Between this change and the ongoing replacement of CFCs we saw a significant reduction in estimated ODS emissions in 2012. This was particularly true among refrigerants with high ozone depleting potential values (Halon 1301, R11) that were assumed to be leaking but reported much lower or even zero quantities in 2012. We use various tools and sources for global warming potential and ozone depletion values including the Greenhouse Gas Protocol’s GHG Emissions from Refrigeration and Air Conditioning tool, IPCC Second Assessment Report (1995).

Americas

        6,307 5,963 354

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        70 96 54

Asia Pacific and Japan

        3,242 723 127

TRI releases by disposition and by substance (See Toxics Release Inventory on page 64)

             

GHG emissions (Scopes 1-3, including from operations)11

Graph Goals 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

GHG emissions from operations12 [tonnes CO2e]

    2,057,000 1,990,000 1,889,000
Data

In 2012, our operations produced a total of 1,889,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) emissions, a decrease from 1,990,000 tonnes of CO2e in 2011 and an 8% reduction from our 2010 baseline. Our total GHG emissions normalized against net revenue equaled 15.7 tonnes of CO2e per $ million USD in 2012, broadly in line with 2011 and a 4% reduction compared with 2010.

Americas 1,238,000 1,197,000 1,098,000  
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 355,000 282,000 264,000  
Asia Pacific and Japan 464,000 510,000 527,000  
Total 2,057,000 1,990,000 1,889,000  
GHG emissions intensity13
        [tonnes CO2e/$ million USD of net revenue]
16.3 15.6 15.7  

12Total includes Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions in table.

13Historical emissions intensity values were calculated using HP's annual revenue as characterized in financial reporting and Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions.

Goals
2013 Reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from HP-owned and HP-leased facilities by 20% relative to 2005 levels by the end of 2013 on an absolute basis.

Progress: We achieved this goal in 2011, two years early. In 2012, our operations produced 1,889,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) emissions, an 8% reduction from our new 2010 baseline.
2015 Reduce GHG emissions from HP’s U.S. auto fleet by 10% on a per unit basis, compared to 2010.

Progress: We are on track to achieve this goal, primarily through introducing more fuel-efficient vehicles into our U.S. auto fleet.
2020 Reduce total greenhouse gas emissions from our operations (Scope 1 and Scope 2) by 20%, compared to 2010.

Americas

        1,238,000 1,197,000 1,098,000

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        355,000 282,000 264,000

Asia Pacific and Japan

        464,000 510,000 527,000

GHG emissions intensity13
[tonnes CO2e/$ million USD of net revenue]

        16.3 15.6 15.7

GHG emissions by scope [tonnes CO2e]

             

Scope 1

             

Scope 1 emissions, by region [tonnes CO2e]

      327,300 310,800 246,000
Data
Americas 192,800 185,200 144,500
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 104,700 102,400 84,000
Asia Pacific and Japan 29,900 23,100 17,500
Total 327,300 310,800 246,000

Americas

        192,800 185,200 144,500

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        104,700 102,400 84,000

Asia Pacific and Japan

        29,900 23,100 17,500

Scope 1 emissions, by type

             

Natural gas [tonnes CO2e]

      86,500 77,900 64,700
Data
Natural gas [tonnes CO2e]
Americas 51,400 45,400 36,800
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 33,600 31,200 26,300
Asia Pacific and Japan 1,500 1,400 1,600
Total 86,500 77,900 64,700

Americas

        51,400 45,400 36,800

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        33,600 31,200 26,300

Asia Pacific and Japan

        1,500 1,400 1,600

Diesel/gas/oil [tonnes CO2e]

        15,600 6,800 7,400

Americas

        3,200 1,400 2,400

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        500 400 300

Asia Pacific and Japan

        11,900 5,000 4,700

Transportation fleet [tonnes CO2e]

    144,800 142,800 133,000
Data
Americas 80,300 77,200 78,900
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 63,700 61,700 51,100
Asia Pacific and Japan 800 3,900 3,100
Total 144,800 142,800 133,000
Goals
2013 Reduce the greenhouse gas emissions from HP-owned and HP-leased facilities by 20% relative to 2005 levels by the end of 2013 on an absolute basis.

Progress: We achieved this goal in 2011, two years early. In 2012, our operations produced 1,889,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) emissions, an 8% reduction from our new 2010 baseline.
2015 Reduce GHG emissions from HP’s U.S. auto fleet by 10% on a per unit basis, compared to 2010.

Progress: We are on track to achieve this goal, primarily through introducing more fuel-efficient vehicles into our U.S. auto fleet.
2020 Reduce total greenhouse gas emissions from our operations (Scope 1 and Scope 2) by 20%, compared to 2010.

Americas

        80,300 77,200 78,900

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        63,700 61,700 51,100

Asia Pacific and Japan

        800 3,900 3,100

Refrigerants (HFCs) [tonnes CO2e]

      77,000 75,100 37,500
Data

HP facilities use ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in cooling and air conditioning systems. Although these systems are sealed, leaks during operation and maintenance could result in emissions. We continue to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in our systems with hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). Although HFCs are greenhouse gases, they do not deplete the ozone layer. We do not measure ODS emissions but rather estimate leakage using guidance from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Refrigerants (HFCs) [tonnes CO2e]
Americas 54,500 53,100 23,100
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 6,800 9,200 6,300
Asia Pacific and Japan 15,700 12,900 8,100
Total 77,000 75,100 37,500

Americas

        54,500 53,100 23,100

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        6,800 9,200 6,300

Asia Pacific and Japan

        15,700 12,900 8,100

PFCs14 [tonnes CO2e]

      3,440 8,200 3,400
Data
Americas 3,400 8,160 3,400
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 40 40 0
Asia Pacific and Japan 0 0 0
Total 3,440 8,200 3,400

14Use of updated industry standard emissions factors for process tools resulted in a considerable increase in estimated emissions in 2011. Estimated emissions decreased in 2012 due to changes in process activity. These data are based on the calendar year.

Americas

        3,400 8,160 3,400

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        40 40 0

Asia Pacific and Japan

        0 0 0

Scope 2

             

Scope 2 emissions, by region [tonnes CO2e]

      1,730,000 1,679,000 1,643,000
Data
Americas 1,046,000 1,012,000 954,000
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 250,000 180,000 180,000
Asia Pacific and Japan 434,000 487,000 509,000
Total 1,730,000 1,679,000 1,643,000

Americas

        1,046,000 1,012,000 954,000

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        250,000 180,000 180,000

Asia Pacific and Japan

        434,000 487,000 509,000

Scope 2 emissions, by type

        1,730,000 1,679,000 1,643,000

Purchased electricity for operations [tonnes CO2e]

      1,950,000 1,973,000 1,962,000
Data
Purchased electricity for operations [tonnes CO2e]
Americas 1,124,000 1,108,000 1,070,000
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 391,000 378,000 382,000
Asia Pacific and Japan 434,000 487,000 509,000
Total 1,950,000 1,973,000 1,962,000

Americas

        1,124,000 1,108,000 1,070,000

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        391,000 378,000 382,000

Asia Pacific and Japan

        434,000 487,000 509,000

Reductions from voluntary purchases of renewable energy and renewable energy credits [tonnes CO2e]

        -165,000 -245,000 -268,000

Americas

        -79,000 -96,000 -116,000

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        -86,000 -149,000 -152,000

Asia Pacific and Japan

        0 0 0

Reductions from voluntary upgrades to other no/low carbon energy sources (such as large hydro) [tonnes CO2e]

        -55,000 -48,000 -51,000

Americas

        0 0 0

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

        -55,000 -48,000 -51,000

Asia Pacific and Japan

        0 0 0

Scope 3 [tonnes CO2e]

          76,720,000  

Materials extraction through manufacturing (Scope 3, category 1; also see Production supplier GHG emissions performance in Supply chain responsibility) [tonnes CO2e]

          23,500,000  

Capital goods (Scope 3, category 2) [tonnes CO2e]

          800,000  

Upstream energy production (Scope 3, category 3) [tonnes CO2e]

          400,000  

Transport (Scope 3, categories 4 and 9; also see GHG emissions from product transport in Products and solutions) [tonnes CO2e]

          3,700,000  

Waste generated in operations (Scope 3, category 5) [tonnes CO2e]

          De minimis15  

Commercial air travel (Scope 3, category 6)16 [tonnes CO2e]

        304,000 320,000 271,000

Employee commuting (Scope 3, category 7) [tonnes CO2e]

          900,000  

Upstream leased assets (Scope 3, category 8) [tonnes CO2e]

          De minimis17  

Processing of sold products (Scope 3, category 10) [tonnes CO2e]

          De minimis  

Product use (Scope 3, category 11) [tonnes CO2e]

          47,100,000  

Product end of life (Scope 3, category 12) [tonnes CO2e]

          0  

Buildings leased to others (Scope 3, category 13) [tonnes CO2e]

          0  

Franchises (Scope 3, category 14) [tonnes CO2e]

          Not applicable  

Investments (Scope 3, category 15) [tonnes CO2e]

          De minimis  

1Some segments do not add up to total due to rounding.

2These figures for transport GHG emissions are based on data reported by logistics service providers that HP contracts to deliver our products. They differ from the larger product life cycle assessment-based estimate presented in the Energy and climate section of this report, which includes additional upstream and downstream transport related to our products, as well as retail and storage. These data do not include data from all recent HP acquisitions.

3Recycling totals include all hardware and supplies returned to HP for processing; with ultimate dispositions including recycling, energy recovery, and, where no suitable alternatives exist, responsible disposal. Hardware recycling data from Europe, Middle East, and Africa, and HP LaserJet recycling data are calendar year. The remaining data are based on the HP fiscal year.

4The decrease in tonnage from 2008 – 2012 is due to a reduction in the average weight of returned units, rather than a decline in the total number of returned units. Returned units during that period were: 2008: 3.46 million units; 2009: 3.58 million units; 2010: 3.81 million units; 2011: 3.44 million units; 2012: 3.9 million units.

5Includes cartridges returned by customers and cartridges from HP internally through 2010. The 2011 and 2012 figures are cartridges returned by customers only.

6This category of data was added in 2011.

7Historical energy intensity values were calculated using HP’s annual revenue as characterized in financial reporting and direct and indirect energy use.

8Diesel is mostly used at HP for testing generators. In limited cases, diesel is also used for long-term onsite energy generation.

9Renewable energy and renewable energy credits, in addition to the renewable energy available by default in the power grid.

10In 2012, we began to calculate ODS emissions by tracking those sites that have reported replacing refrigerants due to leakage. We apply an intensity factor based on those actual quantities for non-reporting sites. Previously, we estimated the level of leakage across the entire real estate portfolio based on the inventory of refrigerants in equipment and in storage. Between this change and the ongoing replacement of CFCs we saw a significant reduction in estimated ODS emissions in 2012. This was particularly true among refrigerants with high ozone depleting potential values (Halon 1301, R11) that were assumed to be leaking but reported much lower or even zero quantities in 2012. We use various tools and sources for global warming potential and ozone depletion values including the Greenhouse Gas Protocol’s GHG Emissions from Refrigeration and Air Conditioning tool, IPCC Second Assessment Report (1995).

11HP has followed the principles outlined in the GHG Protocol corporate and value chain standards. We have also had our global Scope 1, 2, and 3 GHG emissions assured by Ernst & Young. Additional details on Scope 3 calculations and methodology can be found in HP’s ‘Carbon Accounting Explanations’ document.

12Total includes Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions in table.

13Historical emissions intensity values were calculated using HP's annual revenue as characterized in financial reporting and Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions.

14Use of updated industry standard emissions factors for process tools resulted in a considerable increase in estimated emissions in 2011. Estimated emissions decreased in 2012 due to changes in process activity. These data are based on the calendar year.

15De minimis values are less than 0.25% of total Scope 3 emissions.

16Values were provided by HP’s global travel agency which factors the type of aircraft, passenger and cargo load, cabin class, and miles traveled for each ticketed trip.

17All facilities accounted for in Scope 1 and 2.

Corporate ethics goals

Graph Goals 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Corporate ethics goals

           
Goals
2012 Assess effectiveness of training and consulting programs.

Progress: We seek feedback on our programs through surveys, emails, and other means to assess relevance and understanding. We also analyze case data to identify areas for remediation and then assess whether that remediation is effective.
  Lead growth market compliance.

Progress: We provided additional focused compliance-related support and dedicated anti-corruption training to the Growth Markets Organization team.
  Improve localization of training and programs.

Progress: We continue to increase our outreach and reinforce our relationships with the region and country leaders to ensure that our training and programs are relevant and address current issues.
  Begin expanding Wellness Assessments to HP subsidiaries.

Progress: HP expanded its Wellness Assessment Program to assess the compliance programs and top legal and regulatory risks of four of its subsidiaries across all three geographic regions. We will continue to expand our program to assess additional subsidiaries in 2013.
  Mature HP's Human Rights program to mirror other compliance programs.

Progress: We made significant progress aligning the pan-HP Human Rights Program with the Corporate Compliance Program framework and will continue to drive implementation and alignment in 2013.
2013 Increase business-led ethics and compliance messaging and communications.
  Showcase “ethics champions”.
  Continue assessment of effectiveness of training and consulting programs.
  Continue expanding controls relating to third-party due diligence, including initiating re-screening of existing channel partners.
  Revise and consolidate anticorruption policies.
  Enhance event and hospitality screening processes.

Public policy

Graph Goals 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Contributions to U.S. state and local candidates, political memberships/sponsorships, and ballot measure campaigns [$ USD]

  $1,035,650 $1,052,400 $1,284,900 $1,136,447 $1,422,375
Data

In 2012, HP contributed $1,422,375 USD to state and local candidates, political memberships or sponsorships, and ballot measure campaigns in the United States. These contributions aligned with our policy positions and complied with HP's political guidelines, SBC, and applicable laws. U.S. law prohibits corporate contributions to federal political candidates. As a general rule, HP does not make political contributions outside the United States.

Contributions to U.S. state and local candidates, political memberships/sponsorships, and ballot measure campaigns [$ USD]
Total $1,035,650 $1,052,400 $1,284,900 $1,136,447 $1,422,375

HP Political Action Committee contributions2 [$ USD]

  $219,600 $260,000 $378,000 $542,200 $529,450
Data

U.S. law prohibits corporate contributions to federal political candidates. However, eligible employees can make voluntary donations to the HP Political Action Committee (PAC) and legacy EDS PAC. These are separate legal entities from HP that contribute to campaigns for Democrat and Republican U.S. congressional candidates who share our policy views. In 2012, these PACs contributed a combined $529,450 USD.

Total $219,600 $260,000 $378,000 $542,200 $529,450

2Reflects combined HP Political Action Committee and legacy EDS Political Action Committee contributions. Includes minimal operating expenditures.

Supply chain responsibility

Graph Goals 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Suppliers engaged in SER program [total, cumulative]

  630 720 879 907 958
Data

HP's four-phase supplier management system (introduction, assessment, validation and improvement, capability building) provides an overarching framework for suppliers to progress through our supply chain SER program. We focus our resources according to risks posed by supplier activities. The system aims to improve long-term SER performance by building suppliers' capabilities. Since our SER program began, all of our key production suppliers have completed the introduction and assessment stages.

Suppliers engaged in SER program [total, cumulative]
Total 630 720 879 907 958

SER audits conducted3 [total, cumulative]

  486 591 681 764 893
Data

We measure the SER performance of some suppliers using the results of self-assessments, and of others using audits. We use supplier audits to verify conformance with HP's Electronic Industry Citizenship Coalition (EICC) Code of Conduct and to establish whether the supplier has systems in place to facilitate continued conformance. We perform these audits based on EICC tools. Audits enable HP to identify pressing issues and build corrective action plans with suppliers to address those issues, as well as helping us to prioritize issues to cover in our capability building programs.

SER audits conducted [total, cumulative]
Initial audits 235 260 293 330 398  
Follow-up audits 221 292 320 340 379  
Full re-audits 30 39 68 94 116  
Total 486 591 681 764 893  

Initial audits

    235 260 293 330 398

Follow-up audits

    221 292 320 340 379

Full re-audits

    30 39 68 94 116

Audit findings (See Detailed audit findings)

             

Suppliers engaged in capability building [total, cumulative]

  55 68 80 126 216
Data

We work with suppliers to deliver substantial and lasting SER performance improvements on a broad range of issues. Our work builds knowledge and strengthens processes, educating employees throughout supplier organizations. We aim to instill behavioral changes that shift less developed practices away from historical norms towards ever-improving SER performance.
Supplier capabilities are built most effectively through collaboration. HP works with local nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and training groups to deliver our programs.

Suppliers engaged in capability building [total, cumulative]
Total 55 68 80 126 216

Production supplier GHG emissions performance4 (estimated)

           
Data

To provide context for the data we report on first-tier supplier GHG emissions, we also report the percentage of our overall spending on first-tier suppliers that the data represents. Each year since 2007, that percentage has increased.

Production supplier GHG emissions performance (estimated) 4
Aggregated first-tier production suppliers’ Scope 1 direct and Scope 2 indirect emissions [tonnes CO2e] 4,100,000 3,500,000 4,500,000 3,500,000  
Coverage [% of first-tier supplier spend captured]
86% 91% 95% 95%  
Production supplier GHG emissions intensity [tonnes CO2e/first-tier production supplier spend, 2007 = 100%]) 96% 96% 88% 76%  

4Refers to first-tier suppliers for manufacturing, materials, and components. Emissions are estimated based on suppliers’ emissions and their dollar volume of HP business compared with their total revenue. The majority of these companies report on a calendar year basis. The year 2011 is the most recent for which data are available. 2010 figure for “Production supplier GHG emissions intensity” has been updated to reflect revised supplier revenue data. We continue to report the original number for the purposes of the Carbon Disclosure Project. Previous 2010 figure: 94%.

Aggregated first-tier production suppliers’ Scope 1 direct and Scope 2 indirect emissions [tonnes CO2e]

    4,100,000 3,500,000 4,500,000 3,500,000  

Coverage [% of first-tier supplier spend captured]

    86% 91% 95% 95%  

Aggregated production supplier Scope 3 indirect emissions5 [tonnes CO2e]

          3,100,000  

Coverage [% of first-tier production supplier spend reporting Scope 3 emissions]

          48%  

Production supplier GHG emissions intensity [tonnes CO2e/first-tier production supplier spend, 2007 = 100%])

    96% 96% 88% 76%  

Nonproduction supplier GHG emissions performance6

             

Aggregated first-tier nonproduction suppliers’ Scope 1 direct and Scope 2 indirect emissions [tonnes CO2e]

          480,000  

Coverage [percentage of first-tier supplier spend captured]

          51%  

Supplier water consumption7

             

Aggregated water withdrawn for use [cubic meters]

          28,000,000  

Coverage [% of first-tier supplier spend captured]

          38%  

Companies with company-wide water strategies, plans, or policies [% of first-tier supplier spend captured]

          38%  

HP's spend with diverse suppliers

             

U.S. purchasing with small businesses8 [$ million USD]

  $3,365 $3,691 $4,316 $4,400 $4,792
Data

Diverse suppliers bring innovation to HP's supply chain, helping us gain a competitive advantage while supporting our global citizenship efforts. HP's Global Supplier Diversity program helps create a supply chain that is diverse, inclusive, and global-similar to our customers and employees.

U.S. purchasing with small businesses8 [$ million USD]
Total $3,365 $3,691 $4,316 $4,400 $4,792

8All figures are for U.S. purchases from U.S.-based businesses. Data is for the 12-month period ending September 30 of the year noted. Data beginning in 2009 include HP Enterprise Services (formerly EDS) spending. Data prior to 2009 do not.

U.S. purchasing with minority-owned businesses8, 9 [$ million USD]

        $827 $733 $989

U.S. purchasing with women-owned businesses8, 9 [$ million USD]

        $861 $476 $547

Strategic supplier spend on small, minority, woman, veteran, and service disabled-veteran owned business enterprises10 [$ million USD]

        $318 $498

Supply chain responsibility goals

           
Goals
2012 Transparency
  Promote supplier SER ownership and transparency by engaging with suppliers representing 90% of final assembly spend to develop strategies and/or participate in training for publication of Global Reporting Initiative (GRI)–based annual corporate social responsibility (CSR) reports. (See Supplier list for information on which suppliers currently publish GRI-based reports.)

Progress: Achieved. Suppliers representing 85% of final assembly spend publish GRI-based CSR reports. In 2012, we engaged with the Electronic Industry Citizenship Coalition (EICC) to form a transparency taskforce to perform capability building programs and to increase EICC membership requirements to require GRI-based reporting. Through this work we engaged more companies than we previously targeted, and the taskforce included the one supplier that accounted for another 5% of spend.
  Continue to promote supplier transparency in environmental performance and carbon emissions–reduction by collecting carbon emissions data from suppliers representing 95% of first-tier manufacturing, material, and component supplier spend.

Progress: Achieved.
  Outreach
  Advance outreach efforts by formalizing our supply chain SER partnership with multi-stakeholder programs and/or governments in high-risk areas.

Progress: Achieved. In 2012, HP formalized our partnership with the Dutch government’s Sustainable Trade Initiative (IDH) and co-funded the initiative’s newest project to improve working conditions at supplier factories in China.
  Promote worker rights awareness and grievance mechanisms in emerging supply chain regions.

Progress: In 2012 we held the Migrant Labor Training and Worker Rights EICC Training, the latter including grievance mechanisms.
  Performance management
  Extend the reach of our highest-priority supplier improvement programs by requiring 75% of high-risk production suppliers (by spend) with working hours major nonconformances to report on key performance indicators.

Progress: Achieved. In 2012, 77% of high-risk production suppliers (by spend) with working hours nonconformances reported on key performance indicators.
  Expand our audit program by increasing the number of supplier audits by 40% from 2011 levels and reaching 850 cumulative audits.

Progress: Achieved. We have conducted a cumulative total of 893 audits since 2004. In 2012, we performed 53% more audits than in 2011.
  Expand the scope of our nonproduction audit program by performing audits in new geographic regions.

Progress: Achieved. In 2012, we audited nonproduction suppliers in Brazil, the Philippines, Poland, and Turkey.
  Standardize auditor capabilities by ensuring 100% of HP lead auditors are trained in the EICC-Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI) Labor and Ethics Lead Auditor course and pursue certification of all HP lead auditors to the International Register of Certified Auditors (IRCA) EICC-GeSI Auditor Certification.

Progress: Achieved. All of HP’s lead auditors are trained in the EICC-GeSI Labor and Ethics Lead Auditor course. We are pursuing certification of all HP lead auditors to the IRCA EICC-GeSI Auditor Certification.
  Promote conformance to SER standards further down in the supply chain by validating that 75% of high-risk production suppliers (by spend) have SER programs in place with their suppliers.

Progress: Achieved. More than 75% of high-risk production suppliers (by spend) have SER programs in place with their suppliers.
  Facilitate supplier environmental performance improvements by tripling the number of HP supplier sites participating in the Energy Efficiency Program (formerly Energy Efficiency Partnership Program) compared with 2011 and sharing energy-saving best practices developed through the program to date.

Progress: Achieved. In 2012, 50 supplier sites participated in the program (compared with 12 supplier sites in 2011).
2013 Increased supplier ownership and management system discipline
  Increase proportion of independent supplier audits to 40% in 2013.
  Implement a five-tier SER rating system with each of HP’s top five commodity supplier types.
  Tackling new and persistent issues
  Expand and increase frequency of working hours key performance indicator tracking.
  Train 90% of HP final assembly suppliers in China on HP’s Student & Dispatch Worker Guidelines.
  Expand programs to enhance Health & Safety awareness and capability with suppliers in Brazil, Southeast Asia and China.
  Implement environmental improvement programs at high-risk top-tier component manufacturing and final assembly suppliers located in water-stressed regions.
  Expand the Energy Efficiency Program to Southeast Asia including sub-tier suppliers.
  60% of first-tier strategic* nonproduction suppliers reporting on GHG emissions.
  Achieve a rate of 65% of first-tier strategic* nonproduction suppliers reporting on GHG emissions.

*HP considers suppliers strategic based on a number of areas relating to business, engagement, and other macroeconomic indicators. This list is updated annually and is never more than 100 suppliers.

Supplier diversity goals

           
Goals
2012 Increase the number of suppliers reporting Tier II diverse spending and the total amount of spend.

Progress: Achieved. In 2012, HP’s strategic suppliers spent $498 million on small, minority, woman, veteran and service disabled-veteran owned business enterprises, representing an increase of 56% from 2011.
2013 Tailor our supplier diversity program in Australia, Canada, China, India, the UK and the United States to the needs and definitions of diverse suppliers in each of those countries.
  Increase the total amount of strategic supplier diverse spend reported up to 10%.
  Report HP’s supplier diversity spend for Canada and the UK.

Privacy

Graph Goals 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Privacy goals

           
Goals
2012 Continue to participate in key privacy initiatives to expand external thought leadership and drive next-generation policies and practices, working with regulators, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Our aim is to advance new concepts of accountability and to further develop meaningful choice and protection for consumers that also allows companies to innovate.

Progress: We participated in the following global initiatives:
  • European Binding Corporate Rules (BCR) for Processors
  • U.S. Multi Stakeholder process, which develops codes of conduct that relate to the principles in the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights
  • World Economic Forum “Rethinking Personal Data: Strengthening Trust” working group
  • European Commission consultation on draft regulation
  • Accountability project, which in 2012 –sponsored by the EU Data Protection Supervisor’s Office - focused on the specific components of a comprehensive privacy program that a company should establish 
  •   
  Integrate current HP Records Management team into the HP Privacy Office to create a Privacy and Information Management organization.

Progress: We have integrated our teams to create a new Privacy and Information Management organization.
2013 Maintain HP’s position as the most trusted private sector advisor to regulators by upholding an industry-leading privacy program that anticipates trends such as big data, cloud computing, Internet of Things, and evolving consumer marketing methods.
  Certify HP in the new APEC Cross Border Privacy Rules (CPBR) system.
  Continue to advocate for accountability and global interoperability by providing industry input on the mapping of the two co-regulatory systems of the Article 29 Working Group (EU Binding Corporate Rules) and APEC Privacy Sub-group (APEC CBPRs).
  Provide industry input to the draft EU Privacy Regulation to ensure a balanced approach that promotes privacy as a fundamental right and protects HP’s current and planned business interests.
  Support the development of BCR and CBPR for Processors by EU and APEC regulators by participating in the first trial of the new programs.

HP people

Graph Goals 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Number of HP employees (approximate)11

  321,000 304,000 325,000 350,000 331,800
Data

Our global workforce of approximately 331,800 employees worldwide (as of October 31, 2012) responds to the rapid pace of change in our industry and anticipates future business needs. We support their careers and development wherever we operate. Investing in people benefits our business, customers, shareholders, local communities, and society at-large. We aim to continually improve our people’s experience of working at HP.

Number of HP employees (approximate)11
Total 321,000 304,000 325,000 350,000 331,800

11As of October 31 of the year noted. Numbers are rounded.

Engaging our people goals

           
Goals
2012 Increase employee engagement by 5% as measured by the Employee Engagement Index (EEI).*

Progress: The EEI employee engagement score increased by 2% compared to 2011.
  Increase HP vs. industry score on "Recommend HP as a great place to work."

Progress: Our VoW survey showed that the percentage of employees who said they would recommend HP as a great place to work was up two points from 2011.

*HP's EEI is a set of survey questions that rate employees' experiences related to productivity and engagement, measured in HP's annual Voice of the Workforce (VoW) survey.

Building careers goals

           
Goals
2012 Develop and deliver world-class learning across onboarding, leadership, sales, professional skills, and technical development priorities.

Progress: In 2012, 85% of learners 'agreed' or 'strongly agreed' that HP provides high-quality learning solutions.
  Drive next-generation learning strategies through learning and development innovation, technology, and tools.

Progress: In 2012, we provided learners with access to training from their desktop or mobile devices, offered 'augmented reality' digital training for sales reps, and allowed new hires to 'visit' HP sites around the world through virtual simulations on their computers.

Worldwide workforce demographics-employees12 [women as a percentage of total employees]

           
Data

A workforce that includes men and women from different nations, cultures, ethnic groups, generations, and backgrounds, with a wide range of skills and abilities, helps us to understand and reflect our customers' values and demographics. A diverse workforce is also vital to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Worldwide workforce demographics-employees12 [women as a percentage of total employees]
Americas 30.8% 35.0% 34.3% 33.3% 33.1%
Asia Pacific and Japan
30.9% 32.5% 33.1% 32.3% 32.6%
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 28.1% 30.0% 30.5% 29.8% 30.0%
Worldwide 30.1% 32.9% 32.9% 32.0% 32.1%

12 2009 data exclude Brazil.

Americas

    30.8% 35.0% 34.0% 33.3% 33.1%

Asia Pacific and Japan

    30.9% 32.5% 33.1% 32.3% 32.6%

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

    28.1% 30.0% 30.5% 29.8% 30.0%

Worldwide

    30.1% 32.9% 32.9% 32.0% 32.1%

Worldwide workforce demographics-managers12 [women as a percentage of total managers]

           
Data

A workforce that includes men and women from different nations, cultures, ethnic groups, generations, and backgrounds, with a wide range of skills and abilities, helps us to understand and reflect our customers' values and demographics. A diverse workforce is also vital to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Worldwide workforce demographics-managers12 [women as a percentage of total managers]
Americas 25.2% 28.3% 27.8% 28.7% 30.1%
Asia Pacific and Japan 20.2% 21.2% 21.8% 22.3% 22.2%
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 18.5% 20.0% 19.8% 20.9% 22.4%
Worldwide 22.0% 24.3% 24.1% 24.8% 25.5%

122009 data excludes Brazil.

Americas

    25.2% 28.3% 27.8% 28.7% 30.1%

Asia Pacific and Japan

    20.2% 21.2% 21.8% 22.3% 22.2%

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

    18.5% 20.0% 19.8% 20.9% 22.4%

Worldwide

    22.0% 24.3% 24.1% 24.8% 25.5%

Global new hires, by gender13 [as a percentage of total]

           
Data

A workforce that includes men and women from different nations, cultures, ethnic groups, generations, and backgrounds, with a wide range of skills and abilities, helps us to understand and reflect our customers' values and demographics. A diverse workforce is also vital to attracting and retaining the best employees.

Global new hires, by gender13 [as a percentage of total]
Female 34.9% 35.6% 35.2% 32.7% 34.6%
Male 65.1% 64.4% 64.8% 67.3% 65.4%

132009 data exclude Brazil and reflect the time period January 1, 2009, to November 30, 2009.

Female

    34.9% 35.6% 35.2% 32.7% 34.6%

Male

    65.1% 64.4% 64.8% 67.3% 65.4%

U.S. new hires, by ethnicity14 [as a percentage of total]

           
Data

A workforce that includes men and women from different nations, cultures, ethnic groups, generations, and backgrounds, with a wide range of skills and abilities, helps us to understand and reflect our customers' values and demographics. A diverse workforce is also vital to attracting and retaining the best employees.

U.S. new hires, by ethnicity14 [as a percentage of total]
White 67.2% 65.0% 61.7% 52.4% 64.8%
All minorities 32.4% 34.5% 34.8% 31.1% 34.9%
Black 8.1% 11.2% 14.5% 7.7% 10.8%
Hispanic 6.9% 7.1% 7.1% 6.7% 7.5%
Asian 15.7% 12.5% 10.5% 14.6% 12.6%
Native American 0.6% 0.7% 0.3% 0.4% 0.3%

14Sum of "White" and "All minorities" does not equal 100% and the sum of "Black", "Hispanic", "Asian", and "Native American" does not equal the total for "All minorities" due to people who do not declare or who do not fall into these categories. "White" and "Black" figures for 2011 are markedly lower from previous years, as 16.1% of respondents placed themselves in a new "Other" category, which does not allow identification by ethnicity.

White

    67.2% 65.0% 61.7% 52.4% 64.8%

All minorities

    32.4% 34.5% 34.8% 31.1% 34.9%

Black

    8.1% 11.2% 14.5% 7.7% 10.8%

Hispanic

    6.9% 7.1% 7.1% 6.7% 7.5%

Asian

    15.7% 12.5% 10.5% 14.6% 12.6%

Native American

    0.6% 0.7% 0.3% 0.4% 0.3%

Diversity and inclusion goals

           
Goals
2012 Expand global focus on diverse talent to align with business need.

Progress: Co-sponsored Working Mother’s Global Advancement of Women Conference in São Paulo, Brazil, delivering insights for designing women’s career strategies while increasing their impact on the business landscape.
  Broaden focus on inclusion to drive employee engagement.

Progress: More than 9,000 HP Employee Resource Group (ERG) members participated in more than 60 community events across all HP regions organized by HP’s Office of Sustainability and Social Innovation.

Lost workday case rate15

           
Data

The lost workday case rate decreased slightly in 2012 compared with 2011 in all regions except Asia Pacific and Japan, where it remained unchanged. Slips, trips, and falls continues to be the leading category for lost workday incidents, up slightly to 45% from 40% in 2011.

Lost workday case rate15
Global 0.07 0.08 0.10 0.09 0.07
Americas 0.13 0.17 0.16 0.13 0.12
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 0.08 0.04 0.11 0.11 0.08
Asia Pacific and Japan 0.01 0.01 0.02 0.01 0.01

15Lost workday case rate is the number of work-related injuries that result in time away from work per 100 employees working a full year. Rates are calculated using OSHA definitions for recordability around the globe and using OSHA calculation methodologies. The figures are based on employees working an average of 2,000 hours during a full year. The U.S. average in 2011 for the data processing, hosting, and related services industry was 0.2. Americas includes incidents occurring in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Puerto Rico, and the United States. Europe, Middle East, and Africa includes incidents occurring in France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Macedonia, Poland, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Asia Pacific and Japan includes incidents occurring in Japan and Singapore.

Global

    0.07 0.08 0.10 0.09 0.07

Americas

    0.13 0.17 0.16 0.13 0.12

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

    0.08 0.04 0.11 0.11 0.08

Asia Pacific and Japan

    0.01 0.01 0.02 0.01 0.01

Recordable incidence rate16

           
Data

Recordable incidence rates continued to decrease gradually in 2012, with the most notable reduction in the Americas region compared with 2011.

Recordable incidence rate16
Global 0.31 0.30 0.24 0.22 0.20
Americas 0.66 0.57 0.43 0.41 0.36
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 0.25 0.29 0.18 0.17 0.18
Asia Pacific and Japan 0.05 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.01

16Recordable incidence rate is the number of all work-related lost-time and no-lost-time cases requiring more than first aid per 100 employees working a full year. Rates are calculated using OSHA definitions for recordability around the globe and using OSHA calculation methodologies. The figures are based on employees working an average of 2,000 hours during a full year. The U.S. average in 2011 for the data processing, hosting, and related services industry was 0.6. Americas includes incidents occurring in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Puerto Rico, and the United States. Europe, Middle East, and Africa includes incidents occurring in Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Macedonia, Poland, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Asia Pacific and Japan includes incidents occurring in Japan and Singapore.

Global

    0.31 0.30 0.24 0.22 0.20

Americas

    0.66 0.57 0.43 0.41 0.36

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

    0.25 0.29 0.18 0.17 0.18

Asia Pacific and Japan

    0.05 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.01

Social innovation

Graph Goals 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Social investments17 [$ million USD]

  $52.2 $56.1 $44.9 $51.5 $118.6
Data

HP addresses critical social needs through a powerful union of innovation and collaboration, measuring our progress by the positive impact of our programs. Although many benefits of our social innovation programs cannot be measured purely in terms of dollars spent or products and services donated, we understand the importance of tracking and reporting our financial investments. The total value of our social investments, including contributions from HP's business units for social projects, was approximately $118.6 million USD in 2012.

Social investments17 [$ million USD]
Cash $24.9 $21.1 $27.3 $20.3 $22.3
Products and services18 $27.5 $35.0 $17.7 $31.2 $96.3
Total $52.2 $56.1 $44.9 $51.5 $118.6

17Social investments include all grants made to non-profit organizations from the HP Company and the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation, plus the valuation of employee volunteer hours. Data excludes contributions to the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation and employee donations, but includes HP’s matching contributions and contributions from the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation to other organizations. Prior to 2010, HP did not report contributions from the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation to other organizations as a part of these data. All years represented in this chart have been updated to reflect these contributions.

18Product donations are valued at the Internet list price. This is the price a customer would have paid to purchase the equipment through the HP direct sales channel on the Internet at the time the grant was processed. Beginning in 2010, services includes the valuation of HP employee volunteer hours. Valuation rates are based on CECP standards. The number in 2012 is considerably higher than 2011 due to increased employee programs and more complete volunteer hour data.

Cash

    $24.9 $21.1 $27.3 $20.3 $22.3

Products and services18

    $27.5 $35.0 $17.7 $31.2 $96.3

Social investments19 [% of pre-tax profits]

    0.50% 0.60% 0.41% 0.57% N/A

Participation in the HP U.S. Employee Giving Program [number of employees]

  6,700 5,400 5,600 7,000 7,100
Data

The Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation provides employees in the United States with one-to-one cash matching for gifts to qualified nonprofit organizations, at up to $1,000 USD per employee, per fiscal year.

Participation in the HP U.S. Employee Giving Program [number of employees]
Total 6,700 5,400 5,600 7,000 7,100

Cash and products donated by employees and HP and Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation matched funds20 [$ million USD]

  $12.8 $11.3 $10.8 $12.0 $12.4
Data

The Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation provides employees in the United States with one-to-one cash matching for gifts to qualified nonprofit organizations, up to $1,000 USD per employee, per fiscal year. In 2012, HP employees in the United States donated cash totaling $4.2 million USD, matched by $3.5 million from the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation. In addition, U.S. employees can donate HP technology to qualified charitable organizations or schools. Employees contribute 25% of the product list price, up to $5,000 USD, and HP contributes the remaining amount. In 2012, HP and its employees in the United States donated products worth approximately $4.7 million USD. Since 2008, HP and employees have donated products valued at approximately $34.9 million USD.

Cash and products donated by employees and HP and Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation matched funds20 [$ million USD]
Cash donated by U.S. employees20 $3.6 $3.4 $3.2 $3.8 $4.2
Cash from Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation matched funds20 $3.0 $2.3 $2.7 $3.1 $3.5
Value of products donated by U.S. employees21 $1.5 $1.4 $1.2 $1.3 $1.2
Value of products from HP matched funds21 $4.7 $4.2 $3.7 $3.8 $3.5
Total $12.8 $11.3 $10.8 $12.0 $12.4

20Figures reflect the cash donations pledged by HP employees and the respective match from the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation in each fiscal year. Variances to actuals can occur based on attrition. Fiscal year totals also vary based on the payment cycle completing after the fiscal year end. Does not reflect donations made to disaster relief efforts.

21Product donations are valued at the Internet list price. This is the price a customer would have paid to purchase the equipment through the HP direct sales channel on the Internet at the time the grant was processed.

Cash donated by U.S. employees20

    $3.6 $3.4 $3.2 $3.8 $4.2

Cash from Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation matched funds 20

    $3.0 $2.3 $2.7 $3.1 $3.5

Value of products donated by U.S. employees21

    $1.5 $1.4 $1.2 $1.3 $1.2

Value of products from HP matched funds21

    $4.7 $4.2 $3.7 $3.8 $3.5

Economic impacts

Graph Goals 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Net revenue [$ million USD]

    $126,033 $127,245 $120,357
Data
Net revenue [$ million USD]
Total $126,033 $127,245 $120,357

Net investment in property, plant, and equipment [$ million USD]

      $3,531 $3,540 $3,089

Research and development spending [$ million USD]

    $2,959 $3,254 $3,399
Data
Research and development spending [$ million USD]
Total $2,959 $3,254 $3,399

Number of patents (total, approximate)

    37,000 36,000 36,000
Data
Number of patents (total, approximate)
Total 37,000 36,000 36,000

401(k) expense22 [$ million USD]

      $535 $626 $628

Advertising cost (approximate) [$ million USD]

      $1,000 $1,200 $1,000

Total dividend payments [$ million USD]

      $771 $844 $1,015

Share repurchases [$ million USD]

      $11,042 $10,117 $1,619

1Some segments do not add up to total due to rounding.

2Reflects combined HP Political Action Committee and legacy EDS Political Action Committee contributions. Includes minimal operating expenditures.

3Data for past years may differ from previous reports because HP receives the details of some audits after the Global Citizenship Report publication deadline. Includes production suppliers only.

4Refers to first-tier suppliers for manufacturing, materials, and components. Emissions are estimated based on suppliers’ emissions and their dollar volume of HP business compared with their total revenue. The majority of these companies report on a calendar year basis. The year 2011 is the most recent for which data are available. 2010 figure for “Production supplier GHG emissions intensity” has been updated to reflect revised supplier revenue data. We continue to report the original number for the purposes of the Carbon Disclosure Project. Previous 2010 figure: 94%.

5Numbers only take into account Scope 3 categories that suppliers report on. The World Resources Institute (WRI) defines Scope 1, 2, and 3 GHG emissions in its Greenhouse Gas Protocol; see www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/faq.

6Emissions are estimated based on suppliers’ emissions and their dollar volume of HP business compared with their total revenue. The majority of these companies report on a calendar year basis. The year 2011 is the most recent for which data are available.

7Consumption is estimated based on suppliers’ consumption and their dollar volume of HP business compared with their total revenue. The majority of these companies report on a calendar year basis. The year 2011 is the most recent for which data are available.

8All figures are for U.S. purchases from U.S.-based businesses. Data is for the 12-month period ending September 30 of the year noted. Data beginning in 2009 include HP Enterprise Services (formerly EDS) spending. Data prior to 2009 do not.

9 Beginning in 2011, we did not include combined spend in the minority-owned businesses and women-owned businesses categories, which decreased the total spend compared with the prior year.

10Figures include production and nonproduction suppliers. HP considers suppliers strategic based on a number of areas relating to business, engagement, and other macroeconomic indicators. This list is updated annually and never includes more than 100 suppliers.

11As of October 31 of the year noted. Numbers are rounded.

122009 data exclude Brazil.

132009 data exclude Brazil and reflect the time period January 1, 2009, to November 30, 2009.

14Sum of “White” and “All minorities” does not equal 100%, and the sum of “Black,” “Hispanic,” “Asian,” and “Native American” does not equal the total for “All minorities” because some people do not declare or do not fall into these categories. “White” and “Black” figures for 2011 are markedly lower from other years, as 16.1% of respondents placed themselves in a new “Other” category, which does not allow identification by ethnicity.

15 Lost workday case rate is the number of work-related injuries that result in time away from work per 100 employees working a full year. Rates are calculated using OSHA definitions for recordability around the globe and using OSHA calculation methodologies. The figures are based on employees working an average of 2,000 hours during a full year. The U.S. average in 2011 for the data processing, hosting, and related services industry was 0.2. Americas includes incidents occurring in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Puerto Rico, and the United States. Europe, Middle East, and Africa includes incidents occurring in France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Macedonia, Poland, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Asia Pacific and Japan includes incidents occurring in Japan and Singapore.

16 Recordable incidence rate is the number of all work-related lost-time and no-lost-time cases requiring more than first aid per 100 employees working a full year. Rates are calculated using OSHA definitions for recordability around the globe and using OSHA calculation methodologies. The figures are based on employees working an average of 2,000 hours during a full year. The U.S. average in 2011 for the data processing, hosting, and related services industry was 0.6. Americas includes incidents occurring in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Puerto Rico, and the United States. Europe, Middle East, and Africa includes incidents occurring in Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Macedonia, Poland, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Asia Pacific and Japan includes incidents occurring in Japan and Singapore.

17 Social investments include all grants made to non-profit organizations from the HP Company and the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation, plus the valuation of employee volunteer hours. Data exclude contributions to the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation and employee donations, but include HP’s matching contributions and contributions from the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation to other organizations. Prior to 2010, HP did not report contributions from the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation to other organizations as a part of these data. All years represented in this chart have been updated to reflect these contributions.

18 Product donations are valued at the Internet list price. This is the price a customer would have paid to purchase the equipment through the HP direct sales channel on the Internet at the time the grant was processed. Beginning in 2010, services includes the valuation of HP employee volunteer hours. Valuation rates are based on CECP standards. The number in 2012 is considerably higher than 2011 due to increased employee programs and more complete volunteer hour data.

19 In FY2012, HP recorded a net loss. Therefore, a percentage of pretax profits cannot be calculated.

20Figures reflect the cash donations pledged by HP employees and the respective match from the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation in each fiscal year. Variances to actuals can occur based on attrition. Fiscal year totals also vary based on the payment cycle completing after the fiscal year end. Does not reflect donations made to disaster relief efforts.

21 Product donations are valued at the Internet list price. This is the price a customer would have paid to purchase the equipment through the HP direct sales channel on the Internet at the time the grant was processed.

22 HP match and expenses for employee 401(k) retirement accounts.