Data and goals

Corporate ethics

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Corporate ethics goals

           
Goals
2013 Increase business-led ethics and compliance messaging and communications.

Progress: In 2013, HP leaders continued to provide clear messaging on key ethics and compliance issues relevant to their organizations through new and existing channels—see Ethics and compliance training, communications, and recognition above. We also focused on middle management engagement in high-risk countries.
  Showcase Ethics Champions.

Progress: HP launched our Ethics Champions program in 2013, which recognizes ethical leadership decisions made by our employees, especially in challenging situations.
  Continue assessment of effectiveness of training and consulting programs.

Progress: Based on employee feedback, we customized training and awareness efforts to focus on simpler messaging, easier access, and multichannel learning mechanisms.
  Continue expanding controls relating to third-party due diligence, including initiating rescreening of existing channel partners.*

Progress: HP expanded due diligence to include other third parties such as global logistics service providers and certain suppliers.
  Revise and consolidate anti-corruption policies.

Progress: We consolidated anti-corruption guidance documents and created streamlined policies to provide employees more succinct guidance.
  Enhance event and hospitality screening processes.

Progress: We began work with HP Labs to develop a tool to help employees resolve questions and receive advice on how to provide business amenities in a way that complies with HP’s policies.
2014 Continue to focus on business-led ethics and compliance messaging and communications.
  Continue to emphasize and recognize Ethics Champions.
  Continue to refresh and refine training and consulting programs.
  Continue improving and enhancing due diligence on third parties with whom we do business.
  Complete enhancements to event, hospitality, and business amenity screening process and tool.

*A channel partner is a company that contracts with HP to market or sell our products and services.

Public policy

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Contributions to U.S. state and local candidates, political memberships/sponsorships, and ballot measure campaigns [$]

  $1,052,400 $1,284,900 $1,136,447 $1,422,375 $1,175,636
Data

In 2013, HP contributed $1,175,636 to state and local candidates, political memberships or sponsorships, and ballot measure campaigns in the United States. These contributions aligned with our policy positions and complied with HP’s political guidelines, Standards of Business Conduct, and applicable laws. HP does not make corporate contributions to federal political candidates. Where permissible, limited political contributions are made outside the United States.

Total $1,052,400 $1,284,900 $1,136,447 $1,422,375 $1,175,636

HP Political Action Committee contributions1 [$]

  $260,000 $378,000 $542,200 $529,450 $350,886
Data

Eligible U.S. employees can make voluntary donations to the HP Political Action Committee (PAC). It is a separate legal entity that contributes to both Democratic and Republican campaign committees, PACs, and party committees in the United States that share our policy views. In 2013, HP PAC disbursed a total of $350,886.

Total $260,000 $378,000 $542,200 $529,450 $350,886

Supply chain responsibility

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Suppliers engaged in SER program [total, cumulative]

  720 879 907 958 969
Data

HP’s four-phase supplier management system provides an overarching framework for suppliers to progress through our SCR program. We focus our resources according to identified risks posed by supplier activities. The system aims to improve long-term social and environmental responsibility performance by building suppliers’ capabilities through sustained, long-term engagement. Since our Supply Chain Responsibility program began, all of our key production suppliers have completed the introduction and assessment stages.

Total 720 879 907 958 969

Suppliers publishing sustainability reports using the GRI framework
[% of production supplier spend]

      66% 82% 74%
Data
Total 66% 82% 74%

Building capabilities

           
Goals
2013 Expand programs to enhance health and safety awareness and capability with suppliers in Brazil, China, and Southeast Asia.

Progress: Health and safety programs have been expanded through these countries and regions, including occupational health and ergonomic programs in Brazil, HERProject, and the HBV anti-discrimination program in China and Southeast Asia.
2014 Conduct worker empowerment programs at 15 supplier sites in China, South America, and Southeast Asia.

Number of capability-building programs

  6 11 12 12 12
Data

Achieving long-lasting social and environmental progress in our supply chain relies on our suppliers’ ability to improve their policies, processes, and operations. HP adopts a collaborative approach and invests in building the capabilities of our suppliers to deliver substantial and lasting SER performance improvements. We work with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and local training groups to deliver capability-building programs that target critical SER issues. In 2013, we conducted 12 capability-building programs. They addressed areas including eliminating discrimination, improving health and safety conditions, improving suppliers’ social management systems, managing student and dispatch workers responsibly, and raising awareness of women’s health.

Total 6 11 12 12 12

Suppliers engaged in capability building [total, cumulative]

  112 247 656 875 1,104
Data

Achieving long-lasting social and environmental progress in our supply chain relies on our suppliers’ ability to improve their policies, processes, and operations. HP adopts a collaborative approach and invests in building the capabilities of our suppliers to deliver substantial and lasting SER performance improvements. We work with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and local training groups to deliver capability-building programs that target critical SER issues. In 2013, we conducted 12 capability-building programs. They addressed areas including eliminating discrimination, improving health and safety conditions, improving suppliers’ social management systems, managing student and dispatch workers responsibly, and raising awareness of women’s health.

Total 112 247 656 875 1,104

Workers and managers reached in capability-building programs2 [total, cumulative]

  12,800 50,600 115,500 322,100 460,000
Data

Achieving long-lasting social and environmental progress in our supply chain relies on our suppliers’ ability to improve their policies, processes, and operations. HP adopts a collaborative approach and invests in building the capabilities of our suppliers to deliver substantial and lasting SER performance improvements. We work with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and local training groups to deliver capability-building programs that target critical SER issues. In 2013, we conducted 12 capability-building programs. They addressed areas including eliminating discrimination, improving health and safety conditions, improving suppliers’ social management systems, managing student and dispatch workers responsibly, and raising awareness of women’s health.

Total 12,800 50,600 115,500 322,100 460,000

Labor impacts

             

Suppliers’ employees working less than 60 hours per week on average3 [%]

            83%

Suppliers’ employees receiving at least one day of rest each seven day workweek3 [%]

            89%

Suppliers in China with student workers representing 20% or less of total employees3 [%]

            96%

Zero tolerance audit findings related to the ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work: freedom of association; forced, bonded, or indentured labor; underage labor; or discrimination

        0 0 14

Zero tolerance audit findings related to occupational safety, emergency preparedness, or industrial hygiene

        0 0 55

SER audits and assessments conducted 6 [total, cumulative]

591 684 773 918 1,090
Data

HP first piloted SER audits in 2004, and we have conducted or commissioned 1,090 audits and assessments of production and nonproduction supplier facilities since launching our program in 2005. Initial and full re-audits cover all provisions of HP’s EICC Code of Conduct. We compare full re-audits with initial audits to see how a supplier has improved management systems and programs over time. The graph shows both initial and full re-audit data. In addition to comprehensive audits, HP uses numerous assessments to target specific issues and risks uncovered through audits, our KPI program, and external stakeholder feedback.

Total initial audits 260 295 334 412 471  
Total follow-up audits 292 321 345 390 443  
Total full re-audits 39 68 94 116 142  
Assessments 0 0 0 0 34  
Total 591 684 773 918 1,090  
Goals
2013 Increase the proportion of independent supplier audits to 40% in 2013.

Progress: We increased independent supplier audits to 48% of the total in 2013.
2014 Increase the proportion of independent supplier audits to 50% in 2014.

Total initial audits

    260 295 334 412 471

Total follow-up audits

    292 321 345 390 443

Total full re-audits

    39 68 94 116 142

Assessments

    0 0 0 0 34

Audit findings

             

Response to conflict minerals survey of HP suppliers for products that contain tin, tantalum, tungsten, or gold (3TG) 7

            >95%

HP's spend with U.S. diverse suppliers

             

Small businesses8 [$ million]

    $4,316 $4,400 $4,792 $3,910
Data

Our Global Supplier Diversity program promotes a supply chain that is diverse and inclusive, reflecting the demographics of our customers and employees. We mentor suppliers, helping them to increase their capacity and capabilities. We also maintain partnerships with more than 20 supplier diversity organizations in Asia, Europe, and North America.

Total $4,316 $4,400 $4,792 $3,910

Minority-owned businesses8, 9 [$ million]

      $827 $733 $989 $881

Women-owned businesses8, 9 [$ million]

      $861 $476 $547 $536

Strategic supplier spend on diverse suppliers10 [$ million]

      $318 $498 $431
Goals
2013 Increase the total number of strategic suppliers reporting diverse spend by 10%, compared to 2012.

Progress: Achieved.
2014 Increase the number of HP strategic suppliers reporting diversity spend by 10%, compared with 2013.

Supply chain responsibility goals

           
Goals
2013 Increased supplier ownership and management system discipline
  Increase the proportion of independent supplier audits to 40% in 2013.

Progress: We increased independent supplier audits to 48% of the total in 2013.
  Implement a five-tier SER rating system with each of HP’s top five commodity supplier types.

Progress: With the implementation of the SER scorecard, we have implemented a five-tier SER rating system to suppliers of our top six commodities and further embedded SER practices into our procurement process.
  Tackling new and persistent issues
  Expand and increase frequency of KPI tracking on working hours.

Progress: Through our KPI program, we’ve increased our monitoring of working hours at supplier sites from monthly to weekly. We’ve also expanded our tracking of high-risk workers such as student and dispatch workers, among others.
  Train 90% of HP final assembly suppliers in China on the HP Student and Dispatch Worker Guidance Standard for Supplier Facilities in the People’s Republic of China.

Progress: In 2013, we trained about 50% of our final assembly suppliers in China on the HP Student and Dispatch Worker Guidance Standard for Supplier Facilities in the People’s Republic of China. By 2014, all final assembly supplier sites in China will be trained on the standard.
  Expand programs to enhance health and safety awareness and capability with suppliers in Brazil, China, and Southeast Asia.

Progress: Health and safety programs have been expanded through these countries and regions, including occupational health and ergonomic programs in Brazil, HERProject, and the HBV anti-discrimination program in China and Southeast Asia.
2014 Conduct worker empowerment programs at 15 supplier sites in China, South America, and Southeast Asia.

Increase the proportion of independent supplier audits to 50% in 2014.
  Conflict minerals
2016 Achieve a majority of HP’s 3TG procurement spend being DRC conflict mineral free by the end of 2016.
  Supplier diversity
2013 Tailor our supplier diversity program in Australia, Canada, China, India, the UK, and the United States to the needs and definitions of diverse suppliers in each of those countries.

Progress: Achieved. During the year, we expanded our supplier diversity programs in Australia, Canada, China, India, and the UK.
  Increase the total number of strategic suppliers reporting diverse spend by 10%, compared to 2012.

Progress: Achieved.
  Report HP’s supplier diversity spend for Canada and the UK.

Progress: Achieved.
2014 Increase the number of HP strategic suppliers reporting diversity spend by 10%, compared with 2013.
  Increase the number of HP suppliers participating in our mentorship programs by 10%, compared with 2013.

Privacy

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Privacy goals

           
Goals
2013 Maintain HP’s position as the most trusted private sector advisor to regulators by upholding an industry-leading privacy program that anticipates trends such as big data, cloud computing, Internet of Things, and evolving consumer marketing methods.

Progress: HP continues to be seen as a trusted advisor to regulators.
  Certify HP in the new APEC CBPR system.

Progress: Certification was not available in 2013, due to a delay in APEC approving the accountability agent for the system, and is scheduled for the first half of 2014.
  Continue to advocate for accountability and global interoperability by providing industry input on the mapping of the two coregulatory systems of the Article 29 Working Group (EU Binding Corporate Rules) and APEC Privacy Subgroup (APEC CBPR).

Progress: We continue to support and contribute input to these organizations directly.
  Provide industry input to the draft EU Privacy Regulation to ensure a balanced approach that promotes privacy as a fundamental right and protects HP’s current and planned business interests.

Progress: HP continues to provide input to the EU on the role and structure of data protection offices, data breach notification, and incorporation of accountability into the new regulation.
  Support the development of BCR and CBPR for Processors by EU and APEC regulators by participating in the first trial of the new programs.

Progress: HP is one of the first organizations being assessed and will be one of the first companies certified for the new EU BCR-P program, with certification expected in 2014.

APEC CBPR for Processors is still in development by the member economies and we continue to contribute to this development.
2014 Maintain HP’s position as the most trusted private sector advisor to regulators by upholding an industry-leading privacy program that anticipates trends such as big data, cloud computing, Internet of Things, and evolving consumer marketing methods.
  Certify HP in the new APEC CBPR system.
  Continue to advocate for accountability and global interoperability by providing industry input on demonstrated, comprehensive programs and binding coregulatory solutions.
  Provide industry input to the continued revisions of the draft EU Privacy Regulation.
  Certify HP in EU BCR-P.
  Drive the development of a Privacy Code of Ethics for the configuration and use of big data tools.
  Advocate for frameworks that help us apply existing privacy principles or develop new principles that support the New Style of IT while continuing to protect the legitimate rights of data subjects.

HP people

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Number of HP employees (approximate)11

  304,000 324,600 349,600 331,800 317,500
Data

HP’s employees are a global community of thinkers, inventors, and doers. Numbering approximately 317,500 worldwide, they keep us ahead in our fast-moving industry, anticipating the future information technology (IT) needs of business and society.

Total 304,000 324,600 349,600 331,800 317,500

Employees (regular full time and part time) by employment type and gender, 2013 (see HP people PDF)

             

Employees (regular full time and part time) by region and gender, 2013 (see HP people PDF)

             

World workforce by age group, 2013 (see HP people PDF)

             

Women employees12 [% of total]

           
Data

HP’s global community is one of our great strengths. We employ people with a wide range of skills and interests from different nations, cultures, ethnic groups, generations, and backgrounds. This diversity helps us to understand customer needs, spark innovation and creativity, and attract and retain talented employees.

Americas 35.0% 34.3% 33.3% 33.1% 33.5%
Asia Pacific and Japan
32.5% 33.1% 32.3% 32.6% 33.1%
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 30.0% 30.5% 29.8% 30.0% 30.3%
Worldwide 32.9% 32.9% 32.0% 32.1% 32.5%

Americas

    35.0% 34.3% 33.3% 33.1% 33.5%

Asia Pacific and Japan

    32.5% 33.1% 32.3% 32.6% 33.1%

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

    30.0% 30.5% 29.8% 30.0% 30.3%

Worldwide

    32.9% 32.9% 32.0% 32.1% 32.5%

Women managers12 [% of total]

           
Data

HP’s global community is one of our great strengths. We employ people with a wide range of skills and interests from different nations, cultures, ethnic groups, generations, and backgrounds. This diversity helps us to understand customer needs, spark innovation and creativity, and attract and retain talented employees.

In 2013, 20.7% of our top executives (director level and above) globally were women, up slightly from 20.1% in 2012.

Americas 28.3% 27.8% 28.7% 30.1% 30.1%
Asia Pacific and Japan 21.2% 21.8% 22.3% 22.2% 21.8%
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 20.0% 19.8% 20.9% 22.4% 23.3%
Worldwide 24.3% 24.1% 24.8% 25.5% 25.6%

Americas

    28.3% 27.8% 28.7% 30.1% 30.1%

Asia Pacific and Japan

    21.2% 21.8% 22.3% 22.2% 21.8%

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

    20.0% 19.8% 20.9% 22.4% 23.3%

Worldwide

    24.3% 24.1% 24.8% 25.5% 25.6%

Global new hires, by gender13 [% of total]

           
Data

HP’s global community is one of our great strengths. We employ people with a wide range of skills and interests from different nations, cultures, ethnic groups, generations, and backgrounds. This diversity helps us to understand customer needs, spark innovation and creativity, and attract and retain talented employees.

Female 35.6% 35.2% 32.7% 34.6% 36.2%
Male 64.4% 64.8% 67.3% 65.4% 63.8%

Female

    35.6% 35.2% 32.7% 34.6% 36.2%

Male

    64.4% 64.8% 67.3% 65.4% 63.8%

U.S. workforce demographics, 2013 (see HP people PDF)

             

U.S. new hires, by ethnicity14 [% of total]

           
Data

HP’s global community is one of our great strengths. We employ people with a wide range of skills and interests from different nations, cultures, ethnic groups, generations, and backgrounds. This diversity helps us to understand customer needs, spark innovation and creativity, and attract and retain talented employees.

White 65.0% 61.7% 52.4% 64.8% 54.0%
All minorities 34.5% 34.8% 31.1% 34.9% 46.0%
Black 11.2% 14.5% 7.7% 10.8% 11.3%
Hispanic 7.1% 7.1% 6.7% 7.5% 9.1%
Asian 12.5% 10.5% 14.6% 12.6% 15.3%
Native American 0.7% 0.3% 0.4% 0.3% 0.4%

White

    65.0% 61.7% 52.4% 64.8% 54.0%

All minorities

    34.5% 34.8% 31.1% 34.9% 46.0%

Black

    11.2% 14.5% 7.7% 10.8% 11.3%

Hispanic

    7.1% 7.1% 6.7% 7.5% 9.1%

Asian

    12.5% 10.5% 14.6% 12.6% 15.3%

Native American

    0.7% 0.3% 0.4% 0.3% 0.4%

Lost workday case rate15

           
Data

The lost workday case rate increased slightly in 2013 compared with 2012. Slips, trips, and falls continued to be the leading cause of lost workdays, down to 38% from 45% in 2012.

Global 0.08 0.10 0.09 0.07 0.08
Americas 0.17 0.16 0.13 0.12 0.11
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 0.04 0.11 0.11 0.08 0.11
Asia Pacific and Japan 0.01 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.02

Global

    0.08 0.10 0.09 0.07 0.08

Americas

    0.17 0.16 0.13 0.12 0.11

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

    0.04 0.11 0.11 0.08 0.11

Asia Pacific and Japan

    0.01 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.02

Recordable incidence rate16

           
Data

The global recordable incidence rate continued to decrease in 2013. Slips, trips, and falls continued to be the leading category of recordable incidents, down to 30% from 35% in 2012.

Global 0.30 0.24 0.22 0.20 0.19
Americas 0.57 0.43 0.41 0.36 0.34
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 0.29 0.18 0.17 0.18 0.19
Asia Pacific and Japan 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.04

Global

    0.30 0.24 0.22 0.20 0.19

Americas

    0.57 0.43 0.41 0.36 0.34

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

    0.29 0.18 0.17 0.18 0.19

Asia Pacific and Japan

    0.03 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.04

1Reflects combined HP Political Action Committee and legacy EDS Political Action Committee contributions. Includes minimal operating expenditures.

2With the exception of train-the-trainer programs, HP only accounts for workers and managers directly reached by our capability-building programs. These figures are rounded.

3Based on production-line workers at final assembly sites participating in the HP key performance indicators (KPI) program in 2013 and audit results. We continue to expand the list of suppliers in the KPI program based on business risk, country risk, and identified nonconformances.

4Findings relate to underage workers observed at supplier facility.

5Findings relate to emergency preparedness.

6Data for past years may differ from previous reports because HP receives the details of some audits after the Living Progress Report publication deadline. Metric shows the cumulative total number of production and nonproduction supplier audits and assessments per type (including recycling vendor SER audits) for the period 2009–2013. Ernst & Young has reviewed 2012 and 2013 reported data only. Please see Ernst & Young’s Independent Accountants’ Report on page 138 for the number of audits by type completed in 2013.

7Percentage represents portion of the total economic value of 3TG suppliers’ contracts with HP.

8All figures are for U.S. purchases from U.S.-based businesses.

9Beginning in 2011, suppliers were categorized as diverse or women-owned, not both.

10Figures include production and nonproduction suppliers. HP considers suppliers strategic based on a number of factors related to our business, as well as various macroeconomic indicators. This list is updated annually and never includes more than 100 suppliers.

11As of October 31 of the year noted. Numbers are rounded.

122009 data excludes Brazil.

132009 data excludes Brazil and reflect the time period January 1 to November 30, 2009.

14Sum of “White” and “All minorities” does not equal 100%, and the sum of “Black,” “Hispanic,” “Asian,” and “Native American” does not equal the total for “All minorities” because some people do not declare or do not fall into these categories.

15Lost workday case rate is the number of work-related injuries that result in time away from work per 100 employees working a full year. Rates are calculated using Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) definitions for recordability around the globe and using OSHA calculation methodologies. The figures are based on employees working an average of 2,000 hours during a full year. The U.S. average in 2012 for the data processing, hosting, and related services industry was 0.2. Americas includes incidents occurring in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Panama, and the United States. Asia Pacific and Japan includes incidents in India, Japan, Malaysia, and Singapore. Europe, Middle East, and Africa includes incidents in Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Poland, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.

16Recordable incidence rate is the number of all work-related lost-time and no-lost-time cases requiring more than first aid per 100 employees working a full year. Rates are calculated using OSHA definitions for recordability around the globe and using OSHA calculation methodologies. The figures are based on employees working an average of 2,000 hours during a full year. The U.S. average in 2012 for the data processing, hosting, and related services industry was 0.8. Americas includes incidents occurring in Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Panama, Puerto Rico, United States, and Venezuela. Asia Pacific and Japan includes incidents in Australia, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, and Singapore. Europe, Middle East, and Africa includes incidents in Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Poland, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.

Contributions to the economy1

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Net revenue [$ million]

      $127,245 $120,357 $112,298
Data
Total $127,245 $120,357 $112,298

Research and development expense [$ million]

      $3,254 $3,399 $3,135
Data
Total $3,254 $3,399 $3,135

Research and development expense as a % of net revenue

        2.6% 2.8% 2.8%

Defined contribution expense2 [$ million]

        $626 $628 $603

Net investment in property, plant, and equipment3 [$ million]

        $3,540 $3,089 $2,546

Dividends paid [$ million]

        $844 $1,015 $1,105

Repurchase of common stock [$ million]

        $10,117 $1,619 $1,532

Number of patents (approximate)

      36,000 36,000 38,000
Data
Total 36,000 36,000 38,000

Social investment

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Social investment4 [$ million]

  $56.1 $44.9 $51.5 $118.6 $135.3
Data

The total value of our social investments, including contributions from HP and the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation plus the valuation of employee volunteer hours, equaled $135.3 million in 2013. This is an increase of $16.7 million from 2012, largely due to an increase in employee volunteer hours.

Cash $21.1 $27.3 $20.3 $22.3 $23.8
Products and services5 $35.0 $17.7 $31.2 $96.3 $111.5
Total $56.1 $44.9 $51.5 $118.6 $135.3

Cash

    $21.1 $27.3 $20.3 $22.3 $23.8

Products and services5

    $35.0 $17.7 $31.2 $96.3 $111.5

Social investment6 [% of pre-tax profits]

  0.60% 0.41% 0.57% Not applicable 2.08%
Data

The total value of our social investments, including contributions from HP and the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation plus the valuation of employee volunteer hours, equaled $135.3 million in 2013. This is an increase of $16.7 million from 2012, largely due to an increase in employee volunteer hours.

Total 0.60% 0.41% 0.57% 2.08%

U.S. employee participation in Cash Matching Program and Product Matching Program [number of employees]

             

Cash Matching Program

  5,400 5,600 7,000 7,100 8,600
Data

In 2013, nearly 10,400 employees participated in the HP U.S. Employee Cash Matching and Product Matching programs.1 These employees, HP, and the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation together provided more than $13.3 million to NGOs and schools through cash and product donations.

Total 5,400 5,600 7,000 7,100 8,600

1Some employees participate in both programs. Therefore, this number is different than the sum of the two data points in the U.S. employee participation in Cash Matching Program and Product Matching Program.

Product Matching Program

  1,800 1,100 1,700 1,600 2,700
Data

In 2013, nearly 10,400 employees participated in the HP U.S. Employee Cash Matching and Product Matching programs.1 These employees, HP, and the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation together provided more than $13.3 million to NGOs and schools through cash and product donations.

Total 1,800 1,100 1,700 1,600 2,700

1Some employees participate in both programs. Therefore, this number is different than the sum of the two data points in the U.S. employee participation in Cash Matching Program and Product Matching Program.

Contributions for Cash Matching Program and Product Matching Program7, 8 [$ million]

  $11.3 $10.8 $12.0 $12.4 $13.3
Data

In 2013, nearly 10,400 employees participated in the HP U.S. Employee Cash Matching and Product Matching programs.1 These employees, HP, and the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation together provided more than $13.3 million to NGOs and schools through cash and product donations.

U.S. employee contributions for Cash Matching Program7 $3.4 $3.2 $3.8 $4.2 $4.9
Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation contributions for Cash Matching Program7 $2.3 $2.7 $3.1 $3.5 $3.9
U.S. employee contributions for Product Matching Program8 $1.4 $1.2 $1.3 $1.2 $1.1
HP contributions for Product Matching Program8 $4.2 $3.7 $3.8 $3.5 $3.4
Total $11.3 $10.8 $12.0 $12.4 $13.3

1Some employees participate in both programs. Therefore, this number is different than the sum of the two data points in the U.S. employee participation in Cash Matching Program and Product Matching Program.

U.S. employee contributions for Cash Matching Program7

    $3.4 $3.2 $3.8 $4.2 $4.9

Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation contributions for Cash Matching Program7

    $2.3 $2.7 $3.1 $3.5 $3.9

U.S. employee contributions for Product Matching Program8

    $1.4 $1.2 $1.3 $1.2 $1.1

HP contributions for Product Matching Program8

    $4.2 $3.7 $3.8 $3.5 $3.4

1Data in this table are for the fiscal years ended October 31.

2HP offers various defined contribution plans for U.S. and non-U.S. employees. U.S. employees are automatically enrolled in the Hewlett-Packard Company 401(k) Plan (the “HP 401(k) Plan”) when they meet eligibility requirements, unless they decline participation. The quarterly employer matching contributions in the HP 401(k) Plan are set to equal 100% of an employee’s contributions, up to a maximum of 4% of eligible compensation.

3Net investment in property, plant, and equipment is calculated as investment in property, plant and equipment minus proceeds from sale of property, plant, and equipment.

4Social investments include all grants made to nonprofit organizations from the HP Company and the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation, plus the valuation of employee volunteer hours. Data excludes contributions to the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation and employee donations but includes HP’s matching contributions and contributions from the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation to other organizations. Prior to 2010, HP did not report contributions from the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation to other organizations as a part of these data. All years represented in this chart have been updated to reflect these contributions. Some segments do not add up to total due to rounding.

5Product donations are valued at the Internet list price. This is the price a customer would have paid to purchase the equipment through the HP direct sales channel on the Internet at the time the grant was processed. Beginning in 2010, services include the valuation of HP employee volunteer hours. Valuation rates are based on CECP standards. The numbers in 2012 and 2013 are considerably higher than past years due to increased employee programs and more complete volunteer hour data.

6In FY12, HP recorded a pre-tax net loss, therefore a percentage of pre-tax profits cannot be calculated for that year.

7Figures reflect the cash donations pledged by HP employees and the respective match from the Hewlett-Packard Company Foundation in each fiscal year. Variances to actuals can occur based on attrition. Fiscal year totals also vary based on the payment cycle completing after the fiscal year end. Does not reflect donations made to disaster relief efforts.

8Product donations are valued at the Internet list price. This is the price a customer would have paid to purchase the equipment through the HP direct sales channel on the Internet at the time the grant was processed.

Carbon footprint (Scopes 1-3, including from operations)2

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

GHG emissions from operations3 [tonnes CO2e]

  2,027,700 1,971,200 1,874,700 1,795,000
Data

In 2013, our operations produced 1,795,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) emissions, a 4.3% reduction from 1,874,700 tonnes of CO2e in 2012 and an 11.5% reduction from our 2010 baseline. HP’s total operations-related GHG emissions, normalized against net revenue, equaled 16.0 tonnes of CO2e per $ million in 2013, up 2.6% from 2012 and a 0.6% reduction compared with 2010.

Americas 1,205,100 1,170,300 1,079,800 1,033,800  
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 354,800 282,500 264,700 255,500  
Asia Pacific and Japan 467,800 518,400 530,200 505,700  
Total 2,027,700 1,971,200 1,874,700 1,795,000  
GHG emissions intensity4 [tonnes CO2e/$ million of net revenue] 16.1 15.5 15.6 16.0  
Goals
2013 Reduce the GHG emissions from HP-owned and HP-leased facilities by 20% relative to 2005 levels by the end of 2013 on an absolute basis.

Progress: We achieved this goal in 2011, two years early. We have also deployed Hara software as our new system of record and improved GHG-emissions tracking and estimating methodologies. We recalculated historical data back to 2010 and are using it as our new baseline year.
2020 Reduce total GHG emissions from our operations (Scope 1 and Scope 2) by 20%, compared to 2010.

Progress: In 2013, our operations produced 1,795,000 tonnes of CO2e emissions, an 11.5% reduction from our 2010 baseline.

Americas

      1,205,100 1,170,300 1,079,800 1,033,800

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      354,800 282,500 264,700 255,500

Asia Pacific and Japan

      467,800 518,400 530,200 505,700

GHG emissions intensity4
[tonnes CO2e/$ million of net revenue]

      16.1 15.5 15.6 16.0

GHG emissions by scope [tonnes CO2e]

             

Scope 1

             

Scope 1 emissions, by region [tonnes CO2e]

    327,700 310,400 247,300 207,900
Data
Americas 193,000 184,600 144,800 122,300
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 104,800 102,600 84,100 74,300
Asia Pacific and Japan 29,900 23,200 18,400 11,300
Total 327,700 310,400 247,300 207,900

Americas

      193,000 184,600 144,800 122,300

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      104,800 102,600 84,100 74,300

Asia Pacific and Japan

      29,900 23,200 18,400 11,300

Scope 1 emissions, by type

             

Natural gas [tonnes CO2e]

    86,200 77,600 64,500 63,400
Data
Americas 51,400 45,400 36,800 35,500
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 33,300 30,800 26,100 26,000
Asia Pacific and Japan 1,500 1,400 1,600 1,900
Total 86,200 77,600 64,500 63,400

Americas

      51,400 45,400 36,800 35,500

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      33,300 30,800 26,100 26,000

Asia Pacific and Japan

      1,500 1,400 1,600 1,900

Diesel/gas/oil [tonnes CO2e]

      16,100 7,300 8,600 6,900

Americas

      3,200 1,400 2,400 2,400

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      1,000 900 600 1,200

Asia Pacific and Japan

      11,900 5,000 5,600 3,300

Transportation fleet [tonnes CO2e]

  144,800 142,800 133,100 112,200
Data
Americas 80,300 77,200 78,900 69,600
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 63,700 61,700 51,100 41,500
Asia Pacific and Japan 800 3,900 3,100 1,100
Total 144,800 142,800 133,100 112,200
Goals
2015 Reduce GHG emissions from HP’s U.S. auto fleet by 10% on a per unit basis, compared to 2010.

Progress: We are on track to achieve this goal, primarily through introducing more fuel-efficient vehicles into our U.S. auto fleet.

Americas

      80,300 77,200 78,900 69,600

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      63,700 61,700 51,100 41,500

Asia Pacific and Japan

      800 3,900 3,100 1,100

Refrigerants (hydroflurocarbons (HFCs)) [tonnes CO2e]

    77,000 75,200 37,500 21,100
Data

HP facilities use ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) in cooling and air-conditioning systems. Although these systems are sealed, leaks during operation and maintenance can result in emissions. We continue to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in our existing systems with hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). HFCs are greenhouse gases, but do not deplete the ozone layer. We are also replacing HFC-based cooling systems with HFC-free equivalents when they reach the end of their operational lives. These HFC-free equivalents are not ozone-depleting and have no or very low global warming potential. HP completely eliminated the use of Class 1 ODSs in all manufacturing operations in 1993.

Americas 54,500 53,100 23,100 10,500
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 6,800 9,200 6,300 5,600
Asia Pacific and Japan 15,700 12,900 8,100 5,000
Total 77,000 75,200 37,500 21,100

Americas

      54,500 53,100 23,100 10,500

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      6,800 9,200 6,300 5,600

Asia Pacific and Japan

      15,700 12,900 8,100 5,000

Perfluorocarbons (PFCs)5 [tonnes CO2e]

    3,600 7,500 3,600 4,300
Data
Americas 3,600 7,500 3,600 4,300
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 0 0 0 0
Asia Pacific and Japan 0 0 0 0
Total 3,600 7,500 3,600 4,300

Americas

      3,600 7,500 3,600 4,300

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      0 0 0 0

Asia Pacific and Japan

      0 0 0 0

Scope 2

             

Scope 2 emissions, by region [tonnes CO2e]

    1,700,000 1,660,800 1,627,400 1,587,100
Data
Americas 1,012,100 985,700 935,000 911,500
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 250,000 179,900 180,600 181,200
Asia Pacific and Japan 437,900 495,200 511,800 494,400
Total 1,700,000 1,660,800 1,627,400 1,587,100

Americas

      1,012,100 985,700 935,000 911,500

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      250,000 179,900 180,600 181,200

Asia Pacific and Japan

      437,900 495,200 511,800 494,400

Scope 2 emissions, by type

      1,700,000 1,660,800 1,627,400 1,587,100

Purchased electricity for operations [tonnes CO2e]

    1,906,700 1,932,400 1,921,300 1,878,000
Data
Americas 1,078,400 1,065,600 1,031,000 1,001,400
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 391,100 377,500 382,600 385,700
Asia Pacific and Japan 437,200 489,300 507,700 490,900
Total 1,906,700 1,932,400 1,921,300 1,878,000

Americas

      1,078,400 1,065,600 1,031,000 1,001,400

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      391,100 377,500 382,600 385,700

Asia Pacific and Japan

      437,200 489,300 507,700 490,900

District cooling (purchased) for operations3 [tonnes CO2e]

      700 5,900 4,100 3,500

Americas

      0 0 0 0

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      0 0 0 0

Asia Pacific and Japan

      700 5,900 4,100 3,500

Reductions from voluntary purchases of renewable energy and renewable energy credits [tonnes CO2e]

      -152,800 -229,100 -247,300 -245,900

Americas

      -66,300 -79,900 -96,000 -89,900

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      -86,500 -149,200 -151,300 -156,000

Asia Pacific and Japan

      0 0 0 0

Reductions from voluntary upgrades to other no/low carbon energy sources (such as large hydro) [tonnes CO2e]

      -54,600 -48,400 -50,700 -48,500

Americas

      0 0 0 0

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      -54,600 -48,400 -50,700 -48,500

Asia Pacific and Japan

      0 0 0 0

Scope 3 [tonnes CO2e]

      76,720,000 72,070,000 60,260,000
Data
Total 76,720,000 72,070,000 60,260,000

Materials extraction through manufacturing (Scope 3, category 1; also see Supply chain environmental impact below) [tonnes CO2e]

      23,500,000 21,500,000 18,500,000
Goals
2020 Decrease first-tier manufacturing and product transportation-related GHG emissions intensity* in our supply chain by 20% compared with 2010.
  Assist our suppliers in preventing 2 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) of GHG emissions, cumulatively between 2010 and 2020 through specific supplier environmental improvement projects.

*HP calculates intensity as its suppliers’ GHG emissions divided by HP’s annual revenue. This method normalizes performance based on business productivity.

Capital goods (Scope 3, category 2) [tonnes CO2e]

        800,000 700,000 500,000

Upstream energy production (Scope 3, category 3) [tonnes CO2e]

        400,000 400,000 300,000

Transport (Scope 3, categories 4 and 9; also see Supply chain environmental impact below) [tonnes CO2e]

      3,700,000 3,300,000 2,000,000
Goals
2016 Implement network enhancements, mode changes, and route optimization that decrease GHG emissions from product transport by 200,000 tonnes of CO2e since the end of 2012.

Progress: We have replaced our 2016 goal with our 2020 supply chain GHG emissions reduction goal.
2020 Decrease first-tier manufacturing and product transportation-related GHG emissions intensity* in our supply chain by 20% compared with 2010.
  Assist our suppliers in preventing 2 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) of GHG emissions, cumulatively between 2010 and 2020 through specific supplier environmental improvement projects.

*HP calculates intensity as its suppliers’ GHG emissions divided by HP’s annual revenue. This method normalizes performance based on business productivity.

Waste generated in operations (Scope 3, category 5) [tonnes CO2e]

        De minimis6 De minimis De minimis

Commercial air travel (Scope 3, category 6)7 [tonnes CO2e]

      304,000 320,000 270,000 260,000

Employee commuting (Scope 3, category 7) [tonnes CO2e]

        900,000 1,000,000 900,000

Upstream leased assets (Scope 3, category 8) [tonnes CO2e]

        08 0 0

Processing of sold products (Scope 3, category 10) [tonnes CO2e]

        De minimis De minimis De minimis

Product use (Scope 3, category 11) [tonnes CO2e]

        47,100,000 44,900,000 37,800,000

Product end of life (Scope 3, category 12) [tonnes CO2e]

        De minimis De minimis De minimis

Buildings leased to others (Scope 3, category 13) [tonnes CO2e]

        De minimis De minimis De minimis

Franchises (Scope 3, category 14) [tonnes CO2e]

        Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable

Investments (Scope 3, category 15) [tonnes CO2e]

        De minimis De minimis De minimis

GHG emissions goals

           
Goals
  HP operations
2013 Reduce the GHG emissions from HP-owned and HP-leased facilities by 20% relative to 2005 levels by the end of 2013 on an absolute basis.

Progress: We achieved this goal in 2011, two years early. We have also deployed Hara software as our new system of record and improved GHG-emissions tracking and estimating methodologies. We recalculated historical data back to 2010 and are using it as our new baseline year.
2015 Reduce GHG emissions from HP’s U.S. auto fleet by 10% on a per unit basis, compared to 2010.

Progress: We are on track to achieve this goal, primarily through introducing more fuel-efficient vehicles into our U.S. auto fleet.
2020 Reduce total GHG emissions from our operations (Scope 1 and Scope 2) by 20%, compared to 2010.

Progress: In 2013, our operations produced 1,795,000 tonnes of CO2e emissions, an 11.6% reduction from our 2010 baseline.
  Supply chain environmental impact
2013 Achieve a rate of 65% of first-tier strategic* nonproduction suppliers reporting on GHG emissions.

Progress: 65% of our first-tier strategic nonproduction suppliers (by spend) reported their GHG emissions, compared to 54% in early 2013.
2014 Extend the EEP program to Malaysia and Chongqing, China, adding more than 40 new suppliers in support of the HP supply chain GHG emissions reduction goal.
  Increase nonproduction supplier reporting on GHG emissions to 80% in 2014 (by spend) compared with 65% in 2013.
  Increase the number of nonproduction suppliers participating in our GHG emissions reduction training by 10% from our 2013 baseline.
2016 Implement network enhancements, mode changes, and route optimization that decrease GHG emissions from product transport by 200,000 tonnes of CO2e since the end of 2012.

Progress: We have replaced our 2016 goal with our 2020 supply chain GHG emissions reduction goal.
2020 Decrease first-tier manufacturing and product transportation-related GHG emissions intensity** in our supply chain by 20% compared with 2010.
  Assist our suppliers in preventing 2 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) of GHG emissions, cumulatively between 2010 and 2020 through specific supplier environmental improvement projects.

*HP considers suppliers strategic based on a number of areas relating to business, engagement, and other macroeconomic indicators. This list is updated annually and never includes more than 100 suppliers.

**HP calculates intensity as its suppliers’ GHG emissions divided by HP’s annual revenue. This method normalizes performance based on business productivity.

Water footprint

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

HP water footprint [cubic meters]

          504,650,000  

Water consumed by HP suppliers in their operations9 [cubic meters]

          24,599,000  

Water consumption associated with the generation of electricity used by HP suppliers [cubic meters]

          64,343,000  

Water consumption in HP operations [cubic meters]

        8,493,000  
Goals
2015 Reduce freshwater use at sites identified as water-stressed by 3%, compared to 2011 consumption at those locations.

Progress: We achieved this goal two years early. Water consumption at these locations decreased 8.8% in 2013, compared with 2011.

Water consumption associated with the generation of electricity used in HP operations [cubic meters]

          17,991,000  

Water consumption associated with the generation of electricity used by HP products [cubic meters]

          280,846,000  

Water consumption associated with the manufacturing of paper used by HP customers with HP products [cubic meters]

          108,378,000  

Water goal

           
Goals
2015 Reduce freshwater use at sites identified as water-stressed by 3%, compared to 2011 consumption at those locations.

Progress: We achieved this goal two years early. Water consumption at these locations decreased 8.8% in 2013, compared with 2011.

Products and solutions

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Product portfolio greenhouse gas goal

           
Goals
2020 Reduce the emissions intensity of our product portfolio* by 40% compared to 2010 levels**.

Progress: On track.

*Emissions intensity of the HP product portfolio refers to tonnes CO2e/net revenue arising from use of high-volume product lines, including notebooks, tablets, desktops, mobile computing devices and workstations; inkjet and LaserJet printers; and HP servers, including industry-standard servers, HP Moonshot and HP Apollo.

**Expressed as emissions generated per unit of output. The unit of output was determined per product line as follows: printer output represents carbon emissions from printing one A4 image; each personal system represents one unit of output; for servers, each unit of output equals a task performed by the system, as defined by industry standards.

Life cycle assessment goal

           
Goals
2014 Promote and support the development of an International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Report to establish harmonized product category PCF standards for PCs and displays.

Progress: On track: A draft report is complete. Final Technical Report planned by January 2015.

Paper goal

           
Goals
2014 50% of HP-branded paper FSC®-certified and or/containing at least 30% postconsumer waste by the end of 2015.*

Progress: On track.

*Goal is worldwide, by tonnage. Annual fiber reporting for HP-branded papers based on agreement with WWF GFTN.

Product return and recycling10

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Total cumulative recycling—computer hardware and supplies combined [tonnes]

763,000 884,500 1,018,400 1,152,000 1,265,000
Data
Total 763,000 884,500 1,018,400 1,152,000 1,265,000
Goals
2015 Recycle 3.5 billion pounds (1.6 million tonnes) of electronic products and supplies by the end of 2015 (since 1987).

Progress: HP recycled 249 million pounds of electronic products and supplies, bringing the total since 1987 to 2.8 billion pounds.

Total cumulative recycling—computer hardware and supplies combined [million pounds]

1,682 1,949 2,245 2,540 2,789
Data

HP recycled 249 million pounds of electronic products and supplies, bringing the total since 1987 to 2.8 billion pounds.

Total 1,682 1,949 2,245 2,540 2,789
Goals
2015 Recycle 3.5 billion pounds (1.6 million tonnes) of electronic products and supplies by the end of 2015 (since 1987).

Progress: HP recycled 249 million pounds of electronic products and supplies, bringing the total since 1987 to 2.8 billion pounds.

Total reuse and recycling combined [tonnes, approximate]

  142,400 150,900 160,600 159,600 134,500
Data

In 2013, we continued to collaborate with global partners, vendors, and governmental organizations to expand our take-back programs. During the year, we recovered a total of 134,500 tonnes of hardware and supplies. Of this total amount, we recovered 3.7 million computer hardware units weighing 21,400 tonnes for reuse and remarketing, and recycled 113,200 tonnes.

Reuse of equipment11 30,000 30,000 26,700 26,000 21,400
Recycling-hardware and supplies 112,400 120,900 133,900 133,600 113,200
Total 142,400 150,900 160,600 159,600 134,500

Reuse of equipment11

  30,000 30,000 26,700 26,000 21,400
Goals
2015 Reuse 40 million electronic products and accessory units by the end of 2015 (since 2003).

Progress: HP reused 3.7 million computer hardware units, bringing the total since 2003 to 34.7 million.

Recycling—hardware and supplies

    112,400 120,900 133,900 133,600 113,200

Number of countries and territories with HP return and recycling programs

  56 58 60 69 70
Data

HP provides product take-back programs in 70 countries and territories, including in developing regions where we help raise recycling infrastructure standards. We work with a range of reuse and recycling vendors to ensure environmentally responsible options for processing HP products at end of life and commission third-party audits to track the performance of our global recycling network. For each end-of-life product recovered, we seek the highest value solution, as well as the solution that best minimizes environmental impacts.

Total 56 58 60 69 70

Total recycling, by region [tonnes]

  112,400 120,900 133,900 133,600 113,200
Data

In 2013, HP recovered approximately 113,200 tonnes of hardware and supplies for recycling, 49% from the Americas, 45% from Europe, Middle East, and Africa, and 7% from Asia Pacific and Japan.

Americas 37,500 38,600 49,600 60,165 55,200
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 69,300 76,300 77,100 67,700 50,600
Asia Pacific and Japan 5,600 5,900 7,200 5,685 7,400
Total 112,400 120,900 133,900 133,600 113,200

Americas

    37,500 38,600 49,600 60,165 55,200

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

    69,300 76,300 77,100 67,700 50,600

Asia Pacific and Japan

    5,600 5,900 7,200 5,685 7,400

Total recycling, by type [tonnes]

  112,400 120,900 133,900 133,600 113,200
Data

In 2013, HP recovered approximately 113,200 tonnes of hardware and supplies for recycling, 84% hardware, 14% HP LaserJet toner cartridges, and 2% HP ink cartridges.

Hardware 90,500 99,100 113,650 114,455 95,000
HP LaserJet toner cartridges12 20,100 19,600 18,550 17,350 16,200
HP ink cartridges12 1,800 2,200 1,700 1,745 2,040
Total 112,400 120,900 133,900 133,600 113,200

Hardware

    90,500 99,100 113,650 114,455 95,000

HP LaserJet toner cartridges12

    20,100 19,600 18,550 17,350 16,200

HP ink cartridges12

    1,800 2,200 1,700 1,745 2,040

HP LaserJet toner cartridge recycling

             

HP LaserJet market covered by program [%]

    90% 92% 94% 94% 90%

Composition [%]

             

Materials recycled into new products

    80.0% 85.0% 82.1% 80.1% 78.8%

Materials used for energy recovery

    20.0% 15.0% 13.9% 15.9% 17.3%

Reuse of components13

        4.0% 4.0% 4.0%

Material in storage—pending processing13

        0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

Incineration13

        0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

Landfill13

        0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

HP ink cartridge recycling

             

Ink market covered by program [%]

    88% 87% 88% 88% 88%

Composition [%]

             

Materials recovered for recycling

    64.0% 73.0% 74.2% 69.1% 70.9%

Materials used for energy recovery

    31.0% 23.0% 21.6% 29.3% 27.6%

Reuse of components13

        0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

Material in storage—pending processing13

        0.2% 0.0% 0.0%

Incineration13

        4.0% 1.5% 1.5%

Landfill13

        0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

Product return and recycling goals

           
Goals
2015 Recycle 3.5 billion pounds (1.6 million tonnes) of electronic products and supplies by the end of 2015 (since 1987).

Progress: HP recycled 249 million pounds of electronic products and supplies, bringing the total since 1987 to 2.8 billion pounds.
  Reuse 40 million electronic products and accessory units by the end of 2015 (since 2003).

Progress: HP reused 3.7 million computer hardware units, bringing the total since 2003 to 34.7 million.

HP operations (also see Carbon footprint above)

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Energy use [million kWh]

    4,335 4,252 4,121 4,026
Data

HP operations consumed 4,026 million kWh of energy in 2013, 2.3% less than the 4,121 million kWh in 2012 and a 7.1% drop from 4,335 million kWh in 2010. The decrease from our 2010 baseline is the result of a 4.5% reduction in electricity consumption combined with a 27.9% decrease in natural gas and diesel use during that period. Our energy intensity equaled 35,900 kWh per $ million of net revenue, a 4.7% increase from 2012 and a 4.3% increase compared with our 2010 baseline.

Total 4,335 4,252 4,121 4,026

Energy intensity [thousand kWh/$ million of net revenue]14

      34.4 33.4 34.2 35.9

Direct energy use in operations (corresponds to Scope 1 emissions)

      512 450 379 370

Electricity (generated on site) [million kWh]

      38 24 25 22

Natural gas [million kWh]

    474 426 355 348
Data
Americas 283 249 202 195
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 183 169 143 143
Asia Pacific and Japan 8 8 9 10
Total 474 426 355 348

Americas

      283 249 202 195

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      183 169 143 143

Asia Pacific and Japan

      8 8 9 10

Renewable (generated on site) [million kWh]

      2 3 3 3

Diesel/gas/oil15

      36 22 22 19

Indirect energy use (corresponds to Scope 2 emissions)

      3,824 3,802 3,742 3,656

Electricity (purchased) [million kWh]

    3,823 3,793 3,735 3,651
Data
Americas 2,224 2,187 2,115 2,055
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 1,006 952 947 943
Asia Pacific and Japan 592 654 673 653
Total 3,823 3,793 3,735 3,651

Americas

      2,224 2,187 2,115 2,055

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      1,006 952 947 943

Asia Pacific and Japan

      592 654 673 653

Voluntary purchases of renewable energy16 [million kWh]

  309 467 494 498
Data

HP purchased 498 million kWh of renewable energy from outside providers in 2013, mostly through energy contracts in Ireland, the UK, and other European countries, plus renewable energy credits in the United States. Our reporting excludes renewable energy provided by default in the power grid.

Total 309 467 494 498

District cooling (purchased)17 [million kWh]

      1 9 6 5

Americas

      0 0 0 0

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      0 0 0 0

Asia Pacific and Japan

      1 9 6 5

Nonhazardous waste [tonnes]

    92,500 82,900 117,600 70,700
Data

In 2013, HP generated approximately 78,600 tonnes of total waste compared with 125,700 tonnes in 2012, a reduction of 37.5%. The vast majority (89.9%) was nonhazardous solid waste. Waste volume in 2012 was unusually high as a result of two major building demolition projects in the Americas region. Almost 30% of the nonhazardous waste we generated in 2013 was paper. We continue to use paper more efficiently to lessen HP’s environmental impact and save money.

Americas 55,800 51,300 88,900 43,000
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 19,400 15,900 13,500 12,700
Asia Pacific and Japan 17,300 15,800 15,200 15,000
Total 92,500 82,900 117,600 70,700

Americas

      55,800 51,300 88,900 43,000

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      19,400 15,900 13,500 12,700

Asia Pacific and Japan

      17,300 15,800 15,200 15,000

Nonhazardous waste landfill diversion rate [% of total produced]

           
Data

We reused, recycled, or incinerated around 61,500 tonnes of nonhazardous waste in 2013, achieving a landfill-diversion rate of 87.0%. This was a decrease from 88.2% in 2012 when two major building demolition projects helped raise the diversion rate. In all, 59 HP sites around the world diverted 100% of their waste from landfills during 2013.

Global 84.8% 82.1% 88.2% 86.9%
Americas 81.8% 80.4% 88.9% 85.4%
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 89.3% 87.4% 89.1% 93.0%
Asia Pacific and Japan 89.6% 82.0% 83.3% 86.4%

Global

      84.8% 82.1% 88.2% 86.9%

Americas

      81.8% 80.4% 88.9% 85.4%

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      89.3% 87.4% 89.1% 93.0%

Asia Pacific and Japan

      89.6% 82.0% 83.3% 86.4%

Hazardous waste [tonnes]

    8,430 7,400 8,060 7,920
Data

HP generated approximately 7,920 tonnes of hazardous waste in 2013, a 1.7% decrease compared with 2012.

Americas 3,600 3,030 2,760 2,020
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 2,570 2,560 3,040 3,560
Asia Pacific and Japan 2,270 1,810 2,270 2,340
Total 8,430 7,400 8,060 7,920

Americas

      3,600 3,030 2,760 2,020

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      2,570 2,560 3,040 3,560

Asia Pacific and Japan

      2,270 1,810 2,270 2,340

Water consumption [cubic meters]

  8,542,000 8,290,000 8,540,000 7,684,000
Data

In 2013, HP consumed 7.7 million cubic meters of water worldwide, predominantly for use in buildings, cooling, and landscape irrigation. This represents a 10.0% decrease from 2012, due to the completion of a number of water conservation projects and a drop in ink cartridge production at one site. Consumption at our priority sites in water-stressed locations decreased by 11.7% in 2013, compared to the prior year.

Americas 4,977,000 4,609,000 4,641,000 3,985,000
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 1,205,000 1,245,000 1,291,000 1,156,000
Asia Pacific and Japan 2,360,000 2,436,000 2,608,000 2,543,000
Total 8,542,000 8,290,000 8,540,000 7,684,000
Goals
2015 Reduce freshwater use at sites identified as water-stressed by 3%, compared to 2011 consumption at those locations.

Progress: We achieved this goal two years early. Water consumption at these locations decreased 8.8% in 2013, compared with 2011.

Americas

      4,977,000 4,609,000 4,641,000 3,985,000

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      1,205,000 1,245,000 1,291,000 1,156,000

Asia Pacific and Japan

      2,360,000 2,436,000 2,608,000 2,543,000

Water consumption, by source18 [cubic meters]

  8,542,000 8,290,000 8,540,000 7,684,000
Data

HP’s operations are not water intensive, but we recognize that water availability is a growing concern globally. We are committed to reducing our water footprint, especially at operations in water-stressed regions. We take part in the CDP water program to improve our understanding of water issues and enhance our disclosure. This year, we expanded our reporting to include a breakdown of water consumption by source.

Well water - - - 21,000
Wastewater from another organization19 (NeWater) 6,000 707,000 800,000 735,000
Tanker water20 - - - 124,000
Municipal water 8,535,000 7,583,000 7,740,000 6,804,000
Total 8,542,000 8,290,000 8,540,000 7,684,000

Well water

      - - - 21,000

Wastewater from another organization19 (NeWater)

      6,000 707,000 800,000 735,000

Tanker water20

      - - - 124,000

Municipal water

      8,535,000 7,583,000 7,740,000 6,804,000

Reused treated sewage treatment plant water21 [cubic meters]

      0 0 0 98,000

Toxics Release Inventory releases22 [tonnes]

  334.8 372.0 243.7  
Data

Five HP operations worldwide—those involved in the manufacture of imaging and printing products use chemicals listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Toxics Release Inventory (TRI). While only the two HP operations within U.S. jurisdiction are required to report annually under the TRI regulation, we include the collective data for all five sites in this report. In 2012, worldwide releases1 of such chemicals fell by 34.5%, mainly driven by significant reductions at our inkjet manufacturing facility in Singapore.

Off-site recycling 260.5 294.7 171.4
Off-site treatment 49.1 53.3 52.5
Wastewater 6.9 6.5 4.2
Air 18.3 17.5 15.6
Total 243.7 243.7 243.7

1Releases are defined as emissions plus shipments to recycling or treatment facilities.

Off-site recycling

      260.5 294.7 171.4  

Off-site treatment

      49.1 53.3 52.5  

Wastewater

      6.9 6.5 4.2  

Air

      18.3 17.5 15.6  

Ozone depletion potential of estimated emissions23 [kg of CFC-11 equivalent]

    9.168 6.678 474 300
Data

We calculate ODS emissions by tracking those sites that report replacing refrigerants due to leakage. In 2013, estimated global ODS emissions from HP facilities fell to 290 kg of CFC-11 equivalent, compared with 474 kg in 2012 and 9,168 kg in 2010.1

Americas 6,493 5,894 320 147
Europe, Middle East, and Africa 59 82 45 46
Asia Pacific and Japan 2,616 702 110 107
Total 9,168 6,678 474 300

1In 2012, we began to calculate ODS emissions by tracking sites that have reported replacing refrigerants due to leakage. We apply an intensity factor based on those actual quantities for nonreporting sites. Previously, we estimated the level of leakage across the entire real estate portfolio based on the inventory of refrigerants in equipment and in storage.

Americas

      6,493 5,894 320 147

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

      59 82 45 46

Asia Pacific and Japan

      2,616 702 110 107

HP operations goals

           
Goals
  Energy and GHG emissions
2013 Reduce the GHG emissions from HP-owned and HP-leased facilities by 20% relative to 2005 levels by the end of 2013 on an absolute basis.

Progress: We achieved this goal in 2011, two years early. We have also deployed Hara software as our new system of record and improved GHG-emissions tracking and estimating methodologies. We recalculated historical data back to 2010 and are using it as our new baseline year.
2015 Reduce GHG emissions from HP’s U.S. auto fleet by 10% on a per unit basis, compared to 2010.

Progress: We are on track to achieve this goal, primarily through introducing more fuel-efficient vehicles into our U.S. auto fleet.
2020 Reduce total GHG emissions from our operations (Scope 1 and Scope 2) by 20%, compared to 2010.

Progress: In 2013, our operations produced 1,795,000 tonnes of CO2e emissions, an 11.5% reduction from our 2010 baseline.
  Water
2015 Reduce freshwater use at sites identified as water-stressed by 3%, compared to 2011 consumption at those locations.

Progress: We achieved this goal two years early. Water consumption at these locations decreased 8.8% in 2013, compared with 2011.

Supply chain environmental impact

Graph Goals 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Reduction in first-tier manufacturing and product transportation-related GHG emissions intensity24, 25 [tonnes CO2e/$ million of HP net revenue, 2010 = 100%]

  100% 96% 93%  
Data

As our supply chain produces roughly a third of HP’s GHG emissions, in 2013, we introduced our industry’s first supply chain GHG intensity goal. We have already achieved a 7% reduction in GHG emissions intensity since 2010.

Total 100% 96% 93%
Goals
2020 Decrease first-tier manufacturing and product transportation-related GHG emissions intensity* in our supply chain by 20% compared with 2010.

Assist our suppliers in preventing 2 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) of GHG emissions, cumulatively between 2010 and 2020 through specific supplier environmental improvement projects.

*HP calculates intensity as its suppliers’ GHG emissions divided by HP’s annual revenue. This method normalizes performance based on business productivity.

Supplier GHG emissions25

           
Data

In 2008, HP became the first major information technology (IT) company to measure and publish aggregated manufacturing supply chain GHG emissions (for the year 2007). This enabled us to better understand our supply chain GHG impacts and how they relate to HP’s overall carbon footprint. Though not a part of our supply chain GHG emissions intensity-reduction goal, HP is also working to reduce GHG emissions with nonproduction suppliers.

Production supplier Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions26 [tonnes CO2e] 4,500,000 3,500,000 3,000,000  
Coverage [% of spend] 95% 95% 95%  
Production supplier Scope 3 emissions27 [tonnes CO2e]   3,100,000 6,500,000  
Coverage [% of spend]   48% 53%  
Nonproduction supplier Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions [tonnes CO2e]   480,000 450,000  
Coverage [% of spend]   51% 65%  

Production supplier Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions26 [tonnes CO2e]

    4,500,000 3,500,000 3,000,000  
Goals
2020 Decrease first-tier manufacturing and product transportation-related GHG emissions intensity** in our supply chain by 20% compared with 2010.

Assist our suppliers in preventing 2 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) of GHG emissions, cumulatively between 2010 and 2020 through specific supplier environmental improvement projects.

**HP calculates intensity as its suppliers’ GHG emissions divided by HP’s annual revenue. This method normalizes performance based on business productivity.

Coverage [% of spend]

      95% 95% 95%  

Production supplier Scope 3 emissions27 [tonnes CO2e]

        3,100,000 6,500,000  

Coverage [% of spend]

        48% 53%  

Nonproduction supplier Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions [tonnes CO2e]

      480,000 450,000  
Goals
2013 Achieve a rate of 65% of first-tier strategic* nonproduction suppliers reporting on GHG emissions.

Progress: 65% of our first-tier strategic nonproduction suppliers (by spend) reported their GHG emissions, compared to 54% in early 2013.
2014 Increase nonproduction supplier reporting on GHG emissions to 80% in 2014 (by spend) compared with 65% in 2013.
  Increase the number of nonproduction suppliers participating in our GHG emissions reduction training by 10% from our 2013 baseline.

*HP considers suppliers strategic based on a number of areas relating to business, engagement, and other macroeconomic indicators. This list is updated annually and never includes more than 100 suppliers.

Coverage [% of spend]

        51% 65%  

Estimated GHG emissions from product transport28 [tonnes CO2e]

  1,900,000 1,900,000 1,700,000 1,600,000
Data

GHG emissions from transporting HP products totaled an estimated 1.6 million tonnes of CO2e in 2013, 6% less than in 2012.

Total   1,900,000 1,900,000 1,700,000 1,600,000
Goals
2016 Implement network enhancements, mode changes, and route optimization that decrease GHG emissions from product transport by 200,000 tonnes of CO2e since the end of 2012.

Progress: We have replaced our 2016 goal with our 2020 supply chain GHG emissions reduction goal.
2020 Decrease first-tier manufacturing and product transportation-related GHG emissions intensity* in our supply chain by 20% compared with 2010.
  Assist our suppliers in preventing 2 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) of GHG emissions, cumulatively between 2010 and 2020 through specific supplier environmental improvement projects.

*HP calculates intensity as its suppliers’ GHG emissions divided by HP’s annual revenue. This method normalizes performance based on business productivity.

Supplier water withdrawal29

             

Production supplier water withdrawn for use [cubic meters]

        28,000,000 27,000,000  

Coverage [% of spend]

        38% 62%  

Production suppliers with water withdrawal goals [% of spend]

        38% 41%  

Supplier waste generation30

             

Production supplier nonhazardous waste generation [tonnes]

          1,455,000  

Coverage [% of spend captured]

          54%  

Production supplier hazardous waste generation [tonnes]

          1,445,000  

Coverage [% of spend captured]

          64%  

Production suppliers with waste-related goals [% of spend]

          44%  

Supply chain environmental impact goals

           
Goals
2013 Implement environmental improvement programs at high-risk top-tier component manufacturing and final assembly suppliers located in water-stressed regions.

Progress: In 2013, HP piloted a program to assist suppliers in water-stressed regions. These suppliers are using the GSCP Environmental Reference Tools to understand water risks, compare their water management efforts to global best practices, and implement changes where necessary. We plan to expand this initiative to additional supplier sites in 2014.
  Expand the Energy Efficiency Program to Southeast Asia, including subtier suppliers.

Progress: In 2013, we engaged 82 new first and subtier suppliers in China, 26 in Malaysia, and 12 in Thailand making a total of 170 suppliers involved in the program.
  Achieve a rate of 65% of first-tier strategic* nonproduction suppliers reporting on GHG emissions.

Progress: 65% of our first-tier strategic nonproduction suppliers (by spend) reported their GHG emissions, compared to 54% in early 2013.
2014 Extend the EEP program to Malaysia and Chongqing, China, adding more than 40 new suppliers in support of the HP supply chain GHG emissions reduction goal.
  Increase nonproduction supplier reporting on GHG emissions to 80% in 2014 (by spend) compared with 65% in 2013.
  Increase the number of nonproduction suppliers participating in our GHG emissions reduction training by 10% from our 2013 baseline.
2016 Implement network enhancements, mode changes, and route optimization that decrease GHG emissions from product transport by 200,000 tonnes of CO2e since the end of 2012.

Progress: We have replaced our 2016 goal with our 2020 supply chain GHG emissions reduction goal.
2020 Decrease first-tier manufacturing and product transportation-related GHG emissions intensity** in our supply chain by 20% compared with 2010.
  Assist our suppliers in preventing 2 million tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) of GHG emissions, cumulatively between 2010 and 2020 through specific supplier environmental improvement projects.

*HP considers suppliers strategic based on a number of areas relating to business, engagement, and other macroeconomic indicators. This list is updated annually and never includes more than 100 suppliers.

**HP calculates intensity as its suppliers’ GHG emissions divided by HP’s annual revenue. This method normalizes performance based on business productivity.

1Some segments do not add up to total due to rounding.

2To calculate Scope 1, Scope 2, and Scope 3 emissions, HP has followed the principles outlined in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol. Ernst & Young has reviewed HP’s global Scope 1, 2, and 3 GHG emissions for the years included. Additional details on calculations and methodology can be found in the HP carbon accounting manual.

3Total includes HP’s Scope 1 and Scope 2 emissions in table. Some of the values in this table have changed for previous fiscal years for three reasons:

  • The use of district cooling at the Malaysia Cyberjaya site was identified in FY13 and tracked retroactively to 2010
  • Revised U.S. eGrid emissions factors with year 2010 data from ninth edition, published February 2014
  • Revised Australia emissions factors using NGER Technical Guidelines, reporting year 2013–14, published July 2013

4Historical emissions-intensity values were calculated using HP’s annual revenue as characterized in financial reporting and Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions.

5Use of updated industry standard emissions factors for process tools resulted in a considerable increase in estimated emissions in 2011. Estimated emissions decreased in 2012 due to changes in process activity. These data are based on the calendar year.

6De minimis values are less than 0.25% of total Scope 3 emissions.

7Values were provided by HP’s global travel agency, which factors the type of aircraft, passenger and cargo load, cabin class, and miles traveled for each ticketed trip.

8All facilities accounted for in Scope 1 and 2.

9This metric reports the amount of water consumed by HP’s multi-tier supply chain, and not the amount withdrawn by first-tier suppliers as reported in the Supply chain environmental impact section on this page. Because water withdrawn can also be returned, water consumption is inherently lower.

10Totals include all hardware and supplies returned to HP for processing, with ultimate dispositions including recycling, energy recovery, and, where no suitable alternatives exist, responsible disposal. Hardware recycling data from Europe, Middle East, and Africa, and HP LaserJet cartridge recycling data are calendar year. The remaining data are based on the HP fiscal year.

11The decrease in tonnage from 2009–2013 is due to a reduction in the average weight of returned units, rather than a decline in the total number of returned units. Returned units during that period were: 2009: 3.58 million units; 2010: 3.81 million units; 2011: 3.44 million units; 2012: 3.9 million units; 2013: 3.7 million units.

12Includes cartridges returned by customers and cartridges from HP internally through 2010. The 2011, 2012, and 2013 figures are cartridges returned by customers only.

13This category of data was added in 2011.

14Historical energy intensity values were calculated using HP’s annual revenue as characterized in financial reporting and direct and indirect energy use.

15Diesel is mostly used at HP for testing generators. In limited cases, diesel is also used for long-term on-site energy generation.

16Renewable energy and renewable energy credits, excluding renewable energy provided by default in the power grid.

17The use of district cooling at the Malaysia Cyberjaya site was identified in 2013 and tracked retroactively to 2010.

18Prior to 2013, well water and tanker water were included in the Municipal water category.

19NeWater is ultrapurified wastewater used in manufacturing operations in Singapore.

20Well water that is delivered to the site by tanker truck.

21This water is used for landscaping and toilets.

22Toxics Release Inventory reports are due to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency July 1 each year, so the most recently completed reporting year is 2012.

23In 2012, we began to calculate ODS emissions by tracking sites that have reported replacing refrigerants due to leakage. We apply an intensity factor based on those actual quantities for nonreporting sites. Previously, we estimated the level of leakage across the entire real estate portfolio based on the inventory of refrigerants in equipment and in storage.

24HP calculates intensity as its suppliers’ GHG emissions divided by HP’s annual revenue. This method normalizes performance based on business productivity.

25Emissions are estimated based on suppliers’ emissions and their dollar volume of HP business compared with their total revenue. The majority of these companies report on a calendar year basis. The year 2012 is the most recent for which data are available.

26The World Resources Institute defines Scope 1, 2, and 3 GHG emissions in its Greenhouse Gas Protocol; see www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/faq.

27Suppliers may not report all Scope 3 categories. Their Scope 3 emissions will fluctuate as reporting becomes more accurate and categories are added. For this reason, in 2012 we saw a large increase.

28This data for transport GHG emissions is based on data reported by logistics service providers that HP contracts to deliver our products. It does not include data from all recent HP acquisitions. It differs from the larger product life cycle assessment-based estimate presented in the Carbon footprint section above, which includes additional upstream and downstream transport related to our products, as well as retail and storage.

29This metric reports the amount of water withdrawn by suppliers, not the amount consumed by our multi-tier supply chain as reported in our total water footprint in the Water footprint section above. Because water withdrawn can also be returned, this footprint is inherently larger. Refers to first-tier suppliers for manufacturing, materials, and components. Withdrawal is estimated based on suppliers’ reported water withdrawal and their dollar volume of HP business compared with their total revenue. The majority of these companies report on a calendar year basis. The year 2012 is the most recent for which data are available; 2011 is the earliest.

30 Waste data are estimated based on suppliers’ waste data and their dollar volume of HP business compared with their total revenue. The majority of these companies report on a calendar year basis. The year 2012 is the most recent for which data are available.