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Hybrid Content Delivery in Education

Connecting the Best of Then with the Best of Now

Technology in education. It’s an easy phrase to toss around, but what does it actually mean? Is there a way to integrate technology into the classroom that generates superior educational benefits (and outcomes) for students? Here at HP, we’ve found that a blended model that combines the best of printed content and digital experience is an important piece of the overall solution.

Spotting the challenges

Print

Large, heavy textbooks are old school. They’re often outdated before they even make it to students, and their rising costs are a burden on school districts.

Digital

100% digital education is not yet – and may never be – a reality. In 2012, South Korea curtailed a $2 billion initiative to go paperless after encountering substantial challenges with student distraction and focus.1

But print and digital materials both have their strengths

Student-preferred text formats
13%
Electronic text
87%
Printed text

Print

Comprehension and retention can be higher with printed text due to how the brain interprets printed versus electronic text. For conceptual knowledge and complex topics, print has demonstrated to be more effective.2 Not only that, but 87% of students prefer reading printed books for long form text.3

Student involvement in classrooms using technology
23%
Without mobile devices
77%
With mobile devices

Digital

Digital devices can extend the educational experience beyond text to video, interactive experiences and visual tools that can greatly enhance comprehension. 77% of teachers say mobile devices increase student engagement in learning.4 These digital tools utilize both hardware and software capabilities to maximize experiential learning and complement the benefits of printed text.

The Hybrid Content Model

Our concept of a hybrid content delivery educational model augments the best of printed materials with digital experiences for enhanced interaction, collaboration, assessment, and ultimately, customization.

Stage 1: Content

Print

Comprehension and retention can be higher with printed text due to how the brain interprets printed versus electronic text. For conceptual knowledge and complex topics, print has demonstrated to be more effective.2 Not only that, but 87% of students prefer reading printed books for long form text.3

Digital

Using the printed text as a gateway, digital devices augment student learning with rich multimedia experiences, including videos, interactive demos and study guides. This digital content adds additional modalities to content which helps address all learning styles.

Stage 2: Learning & Understanding

Print

Printed texts again serve as the foundation of classroom learning and common gateway to deeper educational experiences.

Digital

Digital devices sync with Learning and Classroom Management Systems to extend digital experiences into classrooms under both student and educator guidance.

Stage 3: Assessment

Digital devices aid assessment and allow the capture of analytics that can be used to optimize and customize ongoing content selection.

Learning Aids

Print-on-Demand Textbooks

On-demand printing allows schools and districts to “mass customize” textbooks and streamline content based on how and when students learn. Imagine if schools could provide all subject content arranged for a single quarter or semester.

Hybrid Content Capture

With the new HP Education Edition tablets, students can write notes or sketch directly onto paper, then digitize them to their tablets, neatly bridging the best of print and digital educational content.

Learn more about mobility’s role in education at hp.com/businessmobility


1

Schools Face Transition to Digital Textbooks, 2011 – The Chosunilbo

2

Noyes, J. M. & Garland, K. J. (2008). Computer- versus paper-based tasks: Are they equivalent? Ergonomics, 51(9), 1352-1375.

3

Student Monitor, 2015 – The Washington Post

4

Mobile Learning in the United States 2014, Infographic – Speak Up 2014 Research Project, Project Tomorrow.